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  • JackW
    started a topic Finding The Perfect Diet

    Finding The Perfect Diet

    As everyone should know, every individuals dietary requirements are different. I'm really trying my best to find out what the most healthy and sustainable option for a diet there is for me, if someone can perhaps give me any advice or direction I'd really appreciate it! Just an important thing to note, is that I'm only 18 and in relatively healthy shape - I'm not looking to lose weight. Just to be healthy, feeling leaner, quicker and stronger..

    So, to begin with a lot of people might try to quickly suggest a vegan diet because I used the word sustainable. Well, please consider the fact that I'm of a North-Western European decent. The fact is, my ancestors were, and I have been brought up as a meat eater.

    So, I am confident that despite being open to the possibility of a plant-based diet. I think this will cause me to have serious deficiencies like a lot of vegans blindy have, such as a vitamin B12 deficiency.

    However, the problem I'm having is where my meat is sourced. All the meat that is readily available and affordable for me is factory farmed, horrendously unsustainably sourced meat.

    So, realistically what I'm after is some sort of diet (perhaps a food delivery service) that doesn't shy away from using meat as well as plant based meals and a good amount of vegetables. BUT, that is genuinely ethical and isn't a huge detriment to our environment like most typical meat eater or vegan diets.

    Any ideas, advice or direction again would be much appreciated, and I'm more than happy to be corrected about anything I've said and discuss it further.

    Have an absolutely great day everyone!

    Jack

  • Soliloquy72
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, I'd look for an Aldi or Lidl! Both great stores with high-quality foods and low prices. I wish I had Aldo and Lidl near me.

  • Soliloquy72
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, in a huge city like London, pasture-raised meats are going to be very expensive. Only high-end markets would have them. You might be able to find some co-ops, though. We used to live in a city (not nearly as big as London, though) and people formed little co-ops. We would take turns driving out to the country to pick up fresh meat and produce from small farmers. Here is one possible source. They may also know of some delivery services. Until then, I'd just focus on eating as many unprocessed foods as you can. http://chapters.westonaprice.org/londonon/about-us/

  • ayj67
    replied
    Jack,

    If you are in UK, then we have a change or dynamics. Aldi or Costco (Walmart) is available? If the source of meat is not from US (in UK or other part of Europe) and I really will not worry about the hormone and additive in the meat. The whole world seems to control the quality of feeds for the meat better than US. Yes, even it is factory groomed farm animals, unless you become a farmer, you have very little say in the process.

    I am thinking you might want to switch a career to become a butcher in the market or supermarket that you can get access to meat, know where they are from, how to cook them perfect. You can then learn to be a chef like Jamie Oliver. You are still 18, plenty of opportunities ahead of you to try different things.

    US' meat is relatively inexpensive for conventional factory gmo grain fed animals. Our focus is with the harmful effect of exposing our body to gmo crops continuously that lead to many people having allergies and chronic illness. Since gmo is not allowed in Europe, then you have less the harmful effect fear, the hurdle you need to overcome is the mental and ideals of pasture free range animals vs caged factory growing practice. Please, pick your battle.

    I think what you can do is to find a store that sells cheap cut of meat (tough meat) and get a few lbs. Learn to make a stew on your day off of the week and put all kind of vegetables that you can get your hands on to eat with the stews for the rest of the week. You need to it slow simmer the stew for a few hours and then package them in portion for the rest of the week. Raw vegetables is easy to be cut up and add to stew on the week day.

    Since you are a man, you have the special ability of eating the same thing for a week or two without complains. So, your lacking in cooking skill or variety in the beginning will not make you miserable at all.

    For protein, if you are having collagen (skin and bone joints) in the soup, you really do not need to eat that much meat to sustain health. If it is cheaper to buy a whole chicken, buy a whole chicken, roast it and use the carcass to make soup.

    I applaud you for the desire to figure these important thing out this early in your life. Controlling what we eat and going into a body control out own health.

    Eggs and butter are also good protein source... Haha, I actually use butter from Ireland, Kerry Gold.

    Leave a comment:


  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    Once again, a massive thank you for your reply. I'm thankful for people like you really trying to help me out!

    And yes, I once again apologise for how I worded my initial post - my experience with this is still very much in its infancy.

    Although I live in London, I will most definitely try to find some of your suggestions at a decent price that I can cook myself. Although this isn't always the cheapest, I'm more than willing to make the sacrifice to try and improve the way I eat. I'm open to any kind of diet really, I suppose it will be a matter of trial and error to find the one that works for me.

    Thanks very much for your help! And if you have any other suggestions/comments please do send them over, I'll be sure to read them!

    Have a great day,

    Jack

  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    It's possible, but I live in a very urbanised part of London and it seemed difficult to find good pasture-raised meat, at least at an affordable price!

  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    Hi there!

    First of all, thanks very much for taking the time to reply! I'm definitely not intentionally convincing myself either type of diet is good or bad - I'm most definitely open to either.

    As for my definition of a plant based diet, I'm mistaken! I have little to no experience with paying attention to what I'm eating, so I really do appreciate you clearing some of these things up for me!

    Finally, like you said the best thing to do would be to cook my own meals. But unfortunately, I'm an apprentice living in London and I have an extremely tight budget (supermarkets are expensive and there isnt any accessible local markets near me sadly) and I work long hours. Although some may call this an 'excuse' having something convenient would be perfect for me.

    Nevertheless, thank you very much for your reply and once again I appreciate you taking the time out of your day to help me out - have a great day!

    Jack

  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks very much sharing! I'll definitely start to experiment with some of these things to see what diet works best!

  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    Unfortunately I'm in the UK, but I'll check in case any of these services are offered here! As for growing my own fresh produce, I haven't ever really thought of that before, thanks for the suggestions!

  • JackW
    commented on 's reply
    Most definitely! It's a simple but effective suggestion. Thanks very much, have a great 2019!

  • ayj67
    replied
    Jack,

    I have to reread you heading and the content, and your term diet means the meals? Or the way of eating? I am so confused.

    We normally call diet, the way of eating, Like Vegan, Paleo, Low Carb, Mediterranean, Wahl's, but not particular to the source of the good ingredients you can get.

    If your question is where do we all get our quality meat and protein... I get them from Costco, Trader Joes, Sprouts and occasional Whole Food (when the meat is on sale, they do have something on sale). I normally eat wild caught seafood (even I bought them frozen and need to defrost). Beef and Chicken are normally organic. I am not putting my hope high on reasonable pastured beef or chicken, but there are now decent priced pastured eggs in Costco. Leg of Lamb is something I bought often when I first started eating grass fed meat around 14 years ago, as lambs are the type of animal that can definitely get sick for eating wheat and corn. I had bisson before (ground bisson at Costco), but that is just not in the price range for an extended period of time. Although not organic, I found the Zaycon Fresh meat product high quality and the freshness is superb, just too bad it is out of business and I do not find it compelling to order from Butcher Box when the various "healthy" store selling the meat are not so much more expensive (or can even be cheaper). Just have to watch out for the sales price. From time to time, Sprouts (Harry or Henry) sells grass fed ground beef for 3.99 or 4.99 a lb (In general around 7 or 8 in the price Northern California). Whole food sells grass fed beef chuck roast for 5.99 a lb 2 weeks ago. On a pinch, organic Chicken that is roasted already is only $10 at Whole Food. 2 of them can feed myself and my kids for a whole week with leftover bones to make bone broth.

    If based on your statement that, "realistically what I'm after is some sort of diet (perhaps a food delivery service) that doesn't shy away from using meat as well as plant based meals and a good amount of vegetables", then what you will need is to search food delivery service and choose the one that fits your ideal, however, figure out the diet or the way of eating first, then the search will be much easier. I know there are Paleo, there are Organic, and there are variety of other services. I don't subscribe to any, as I cook and I love to cook and I have kids that overcooking one day give me plenty of left over for a few days (freeze of use) is the way I deal with my life.

    As explained, I eat wild caught seafood (salmon once a week) and I doubt any food delivery service will think wild caught salmon is an items they can sell and be sustainable in delivery and in pricing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Soliloquy72
    replied
    One other thought, are you 100% certain that you cannot buy pasture-raised meat in your area? Even if stores don't sell it, small-scale farmers often do. But they usually advertise through word-of-mouth. If you want more information on how to find local sources, I can share some links with you.

    Leave a comment:


  • ayj67
    replied
    Jack,

    Are you trying to un-convince yourself a vegan diet or are you trying to figure out how to get clean meat that is not laden with chemical and hormone? I am not even sure where food delivery service (I expect is the prepackaged cut up food) that delivers with the sauces and all included) fit in this thread.

    In am not sure about your definition of plant based diet, but most plant based diet is good, it can be a diet that is 50% to 80% in plants (vegetables and fruit) and 10% fat and 10% meat. Plant based diet does not mean everything was from a plant. I seriously do not consider the pretend veggie burger or veggie sausage should be consider plant based diet.... Anything laden with chemical and coloring and favors to make it into something else is not a plant based diet. Yup, kind of like vegan bologna and vegan bacon. You can eat really poorly and land yourself in poor health in any diet if that diet does not match what your body's need, vegan call this diet the junk food vegan, taking things out of a box and eat it because it has vegan in the box.

    In general, high carb diet from wheat, potato, sugar and corn are bad for your body. The plant based diets most leading diet gurus advocates now are low carb plant based diet.

    I remember there was the controversy from Alexandria Jamieson when she started eating meat again after years of being vegan. Vegan was great when she was eating a lot of meat, and then after more than a decade being vegan. She was in tune with her body and she felt she needed meat. Also, if you go browse the Wahl's diet thread, Dr Terry Wahl's was a vegan, and she started her MS when she was a vegan, and finally, she change the way she eats (it is her Wahl's Diet) and she improved and almost reverse her condition. https://forum.t-tapp.com/forum/main-...wahls-protocol

    Almost all healthy and old culture diets are plant based (not just potato and corn, and things come out from a jar and a package). At the end, plant based diet should be the plant that does not cause issue and not processed with chemical. Gluten, soy, bean, lectin containing like night shades, might affect some people, from trial and error, even those are low carb should be avoided.

    I was helping a single guy improving his diet after his heart attack... He finally subscribed to a food deliver service that have most of the good non gmo and organic. It is not ideal that he does not shop at the market and start all the chopping himself, I pick my battle. However, it is way better than he roll of all fast food joints Monday to Sunday. He had a set day for Burger King or Wendy's, and the most acceptable fast food is Chipotle on Sunday. I am sure if you looking around, the prepackage pre-cut meal services are available and they are giving quite a bit of incentive to just trying it. Still, convenience is costly. The cheapest alternative is go to the market, get your own food and cooking a meal.

    Being able to your own prepared meal and freeze the portion size for later use is the best way to go. You can do a beef stew or lamp stew with a lot of vegetables in it. You leave one or two portion during the week, and freeze the rest in a portion size bag or container, you have your own prepared food and you chopped and cooked yourself and I am sure they are very reasonable in price.
    Last edited by ayj67; 01-07-2019, 07:33 PM. Reason: Editing and add a link

    Leave a comment:


  • dick23
    replied
    I am 215 lbs,active walking 1-1.5 hours/day. take multivitamin

    Breakfast 1 cup oatmeal + 1/2cup mixed fruit
    Lunch 2 whole potato + 1 cup corn + 1/2 cup mixed fruit + 1/2 cup rotolini (or rice)+ 1/2 can chicken noodle soup +2 pats whole butter
    Dinner same as lunch + 7oz chiken w skin Ground beef 7oz substituted

    I think I am getting all my daily average of nutrients but not sure. I have been on it for about 2 months and losing weight and feeling great.
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Soliloquy72
    replied
    Originally posted by JackW View Post
    .

    So, realistically what I'm after is some sort of diet (perhaps a food delivery service) that doesn't shy away from using meat as well as plant based meals and a good amount of vegetables. BUT, that is genuinely ethical and isn't a huge detriment to our environment like most typical meat eater or vegan diets.

    Any ideas, advice or direction again would be much appreciated, and I'm more than happy to be corrected about anything I've said and discuss it further.


    Hi Jack,

    Are you in the US? I haven't used any of the food delivery services very much as I have access to grass-fed meats raised locally. But I know people who have used them.

    Zaycon Fresh went out of business but I believe they were the most affordable. I have ordered from Organic Prairie and US Wellness Meats but only one time each.

    Organic Prairie
    US Wellness Meats
    Butcher Box
    Farmer Girl Meats

    For fresh produce, I prefer to grow my own and go to the farmer's markets. In winter I have to rely on what is in the stores. Eating seasonally works really well for me.

    Leave a comment:

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