Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Collagen

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Collagen

    Originally posted by JohannaRegina 03-16-2015, 02:06 AM

    I want to get serious about taking collagen daily. I use a powder form (Neocell is the brand, the collagen is Type 1+3).

    I know it's better taken on empty stomach and mixed with orange juice, which is what I have been doing. My question is, does anybody have any idea whether it might be better before or after a workout, since those are ususally both times when I have a more or less empty stomach. Or a totally different time? Or doesn't matter?

    Thanks!
    J

  • #2
    JohannaRegina
    05-02-2015, 12:28 AM
    Hi folks!

    Just engaging is some self indulging here and sharing my collagen experience. I was really good about taking it daily for about three weeks. This is what happened and what I noticed:

    - Definitely could tell my body just loved it and sucked it up eagerly.
    - Since collagen is a building block for so many tissues in the body, I think I triggered the 'building' side of my metabolism...
    - Which made me more hungry, as my body was looking for the engery and other building parts needed to build.
    - Especially the skin on my face got amazyingly soft. Also, hair feels fuller and I actually, as crazy as that may sound, thought that I could feel my hair grow. Kind of like a wound that is healing and itches.
    - Ultimately, since I got into the building side, I noticed some bulking.
    - Logically, I panicked and stopped taking collagen.

    I decided to take collagen maybe once or twice a week even though daily seems to be the recommended dose. My body really loves it.

    Just a follow up in case anybody was interested.

    J

    ayj67
    05-02-2015, 02:00 AM
    Bulking... Interesting... Collagen is protein after all.

    Collagen can be obtain at food form... bone broth, actually it is stock, make sure when you are done with the roast chicken, any left over skin and bone goes to a pot of water (cold) and boil and then simmer for an hour or so to get all the collagen out and have it as the base of soup or for cooking stock.

    You can also get the collagen in gellatin powder and mix in your soup or coffee... Great Lake is a good brand. I make grape jello for my kids with grape juice. They love jello and I hate the artificial ingredient. It turnout out to be very good, if you use more gellatin, you can make the gummy gellatin candy of your it. I bought some concentrated frozen mango juice, I can wait for the heat to come and I will make mango pudding with them. Trader Joe has an Organic Strawberry Lemonade, it is rather sweet as juice, but it is just right for making jello.

    Now, recently, I have been using MSM and Vitamin C for skin healing and in theory, that helps collagen production too. I think Alfalfa has a lot of the collagen producing minerals too.

    When I first started T-Tapp, I try alfalfa, and what I notice first was the dewy look of my face. It was after 3 weeks of 6 capsules daily. I used to have old lady hand (I drive under the N CA sun without sunscreen on my hand for years). The alfalfa and dry skin brushing got my hands back to my age. I was starting looking like the 70 year old lady's hand with the sun spot, crepe paper thin look.

    I heard about these Type 1, Type 3 and Type 3 collagen from acne scar forum.

    I probably will use all I have bought first... I have a few bottles of Amino Sculpt still, that is the collagen building material that Teresa started stocking at her store 18 months ago. She loves that and stocks it...

    If you do use collagen, make sure to add in lysine. As collagen is L-Arginine you need L-Lysine to balance things out. I am prone for cold sores and I have that dormant. High Arginine will cause breakout if I am under a lot of stress.

    Collagen preserves or reduce the body's need in actual protein, so if it very important for people who is low in dietary protein to take collagen. You bulking up is likely because of that... You can lower your protein in take. Actually, back in WWI time, I think there were many research done for using collagen as replacement for protein.

    It won't be able to replace, but it will reduce the need and stretch out a low intake to be sufficient.

    I think this is why all old cultures have bone broth equivalent as a regular part of the diet. I think I only have 1-3 oz of meat consumption per day when I was growing up (it is still do when I go to HK for visit), but we have fatty joint meat and bone broth almost daily. The soup of the day in Chinese Restaurant (you can tell what they are and you cannot order in the menu), those are the stew for 4-8 hours meat scrap, vegetable, root, herb whatever you have on hand daily fare we have. Good stuff...

    So, these are pretty much all I have in my brain that I can relay for this moment.

    Oh... the pith and white membrane with the citrus are high in vitamin C and collagen building material... So, don't pick the white off too much when you eat orange or grapefruit. Eating the whole orange is better than just drinking the juice.

    Galadraal
    05-16-2015, 07:46 PM
    Thanks for that great information

    Originally posted by ayj67 View Post
    Bulking... Interesting... Collagen is protein after all.

    Collagen can be obtain at food form... bone broth, actually it is stock, make sure when you are done with the roast chicken, any left over skin and bone goes to a pot of water (cold) and boil and then simmer for an hour or so to get all the collagen out and have it as the base of soup or for cooking stock.

    You can also get the collagen in gellatin powder and mix in your soup or coffee... Great Lake is a good brand. I make grape jello for my kids with grape juice. They love jello and I hate the artificial ingredient. It turnout out to be very good, if you use more gellatin, you can make the gummy gellatin candy of your it. I bought some concentrated frozen mango juice, I can wait for the heat to come and I will make mango pudding with them. Trader Joe has an Organic Strawberry Lemonade, it is rather sweet as juice, but it is just right for making jello.

    Now, recently, I have been using MSM and Vitamin C for skin healing and in theory, that helps collagen production too. I think Alfalfa has a lot of the collagen producing minerals too.

    When I first started T-Tapp, I try alfalfa, and what I notice first was the dewy look of my face. It was after 3 weeks of 6 capsules daily. I used to have old lady hand (I drive under the N CA sun without sunscreen on my hand for years). The alfalfa and dry skin brushing got my hands back to my age. I was starting looking like the 70 year old lady's hand with the sun spot, crepe paper thin look.

    I heard about these Type 1, Type 3 and Type 3 collagen from acne scar forum.

    I probably will use all I have bought first... I have a few bottles of Amino Sculpt still, that is the collagen building material that Teresa started stocking at her store 18 months ago. She loves that and stocks it...

    If you do use collagen, make sure to add in lysine. As collagen is L-Arginine you need L-Lysine to balance things out. I am prone for cold sores and I have that dormant. High Arginine will cause breakout if I am under a lot of stress.

    Collagen preserves or reduce the body's need in actual protein, so if it very important for people who is low in dietary protein to take collagen. You bulking up is likely because of that... You can lower your protein in take. Actually, back in WWI time, I think there were many research done for using collagen as replacement for protein.

    It won't be able to replace, but it will reduce the need and stretch out a low intake to be sufficient.

    I think this is why all old cultures have bone broth equivalent as a regular part of the diet. I think I only have 1-3 oz of meat consumption per day when I was growing up (it is still do when I go to HK for visit), but we have fatty joint meat and bone broth almost daily. The soup of the day in Chinese Restaurant (you can tell what they are and you cannot order in the menu), those are the stew for 4-8 hours meat scrap, vegetable, root, herb whatever you have on hand daily fare we have. Good stuff...

    So, these are pretty much all I have in my brain that I can relay for this moment.

    Oh... the pith and white membrane with the citrus are high in vitamin C and collagen building material... So, don't pick the white off too much when you eat orange or grapefruit. Eating the whole orange is better than just drinking the juice.
    WOW, great info, thanks. Can we ask for the soup of the day in Chinese restaurants in America? I remember one restaurant, a long time ago, I wondered what Miso soup was and she just assumed I wouldn't like it (I think because I'm a white girl) which annoyed me and I'd been curious about it. Once I finally found it in a store (probably Whole Foods) maybe a decade later, I really love it :-)

    I had heard the pith is healthy in citrus fruit and I have always loved eating the entire lemon, peal and all. I pretty much always eat it when it comes in my water.

    ayj67
    05-16-2015, 07:56 PM
    Miso soup is Japanese. It can vary in term of ingredients for the soup or stock base in that regard. As long as there is the fermented soy bean paste (miso), it is miso soup. You can get the variety that is laden with MSG and artificial ingredients in a packet too (with the dehydrated tofu cubes). I used to go to a family Japanese restaurant around here, they use the chicken skin and bone from their Teriyaki chicken (I could taste the chicken and onion broth base). A place sells a lot of saba (mickerel) might have the soup in fish bone and head in soup base. Miso can be white or red. That is really entirely another topic on how to make great miso soup or Kim Chee soup.

    Chinese soup of the day is mysterious ingredients that the chef wants to throw into the pot. It can be tens and thousands of combinations in ingredients of kitchen scrap, roots, herbs, bones and meat. It invariably is cooked for 4-10 hours and that is why it is so good. Chinese soup likely has pork bone in it.... Depends on what kind of bones and meat the restaurant have left over the most.

    That means, don't throw your kitchen scrap away, the roots, the tops, the bits and pieces, save them and freeze them. The day you can watch the fire at home or feel like heating up the house, you start a big pot of cold water and put your ingredients in.

    Yes, I have two chicken carcasses in the freezer, I should start a pot of soup now. I have a huge bag of the end pieces of asparagus.

    Comment


    • #3
      Galadraal
      05-16-2015, 08:33 PM
      That sounds so yummy :-) I bet the teriyaki adds a nice flavour. I am a big ingredient reader and I know to avoid MSG and things that have generic terms that can mean anything.

      My Korean accupuncturist turned me on to Kim Chi that I've found at the grocery store (his wife made the first one I tried) and I really like that too.

      I used to save the Ham bones when I'd get the Honey Baked ham with the bone and the turkey carcass when I made turkey for the holidays. I'd even save the broth from the Turkey in a ziplock bag in the freezer back when I used to cook more. I'd also throw in the celery tops and other things I used to make the stuffing in another bag and make a soup with it. I'd forgotten how tasty it can be :-) I've gotten lazy and it's just my husband and me so I don't cook so much anymore.

      You didn't say if I can ask a US restaurant for the soup of the day. I usually get the egg drop soup but they have a spinach tofu I really love but it says for two but it's more like for four so I usually don't get that especially if I stop in for lunch. If I can, I think I'll go in for lunch Monday and see what I end up with :-) Sounds like yummy adventure :-)

      ayj67
      05-16-2015, 08:57 PM
      The forum just ate my long post...

      Ok, collagen is in the skin and the tendon and connective tissues, so make sure you save the skin...

      Ask for the "Old Fire Soup" if it is a Cantonese restaurant, as Cantonese is really the bone broth Chinese people.

      You can ask them what they have in the soup, but the waiter probably don't know all the ingredients in the soup. The chef is not following any recipes at all, it is a handful of this, and a bunch of that, some dried root, grains or seed, some dried seafood, or dried vegetables. Seriously a pot of mysterious ingredients that might not be repeated the next day or ever.

      Galadraal
      05-16-2015, 09:09 PM
      I don't really mind what's in the soup LOL I just want it :-) I'm not sure if it's Cantonese or not but I love the term, "Old fire soup" :-) I shall remember that :-)

      I was working on posting a new post about issues I've been having and I can't find it :-( maybe the internet ate both our posts. I was almost done too and I need to go to bed :-( I hope they both show up for us :-)

      Galadraal
      05-16-2015, 09:35 PM
      Yay! just found my lost post :-) Hope you find yours, have you tried the back button?

      ayj67
      05-16-2015, 09:52 PM
      I found it at the back button, but at the moment of disdain, I exited out of that window... LOL.

      I used the back button to revive my 60 Days Challenge data entry many times... my post was not big loss.

      I think the restaurant is Cantonese, if they have spinach and tofu soup, that sounds very Cantonese.

      You really need to make your own soup. After one big pot of soup, you let it cool down, skim off the fat, then you put them in freezer quart size zip lock bags and freeze them flat (put that in a box or something so that they don't slip and slide and spat and also to prevent that you did not zip well, I normally put these quarter size bag inside a gallon size bag before the freezer). Reheating is very easy.

      In fact, I think that is one of the leaky guts healing requirement for the GAPS diet. I think Trisch might still be drinking one cup of bone broth a day and I am sure she freezes portions. Once you have the broth, you can add more things in when you feel like making soup.

      Spinach and Tofu is easy, you just put a few handful of spinach and a few cubes of tofu, salt, etc. When I am sick, I add a lot of curry powder and cayenne. If I am really sick like having bronchitis, then, it will be a few splashes of apple cider vinegar with cayenne in broth to make a quick hot and sour soup (none of the other ingredients).

      I bulk cook and freeze all the time. Finally, my 13 year old is having an appetite. I am used to cook for 8 (growing up with 4 sisters and we all eat a lot), and it is difficult to just cook for one or two. So, I cook as the way I always cook, and I hate to have half a bag or this or 1/3 a bag of what left, I double or triple the volume to cook them all, as half a bag means it will be spoil within 10 days. Yup, dish out serving size portion and freeze them separately in individual freezer bags. No more waste and there is always a good meal ready in 15 mins for reheating at the stove or toaster oven.

      I use high power counter top toaster oven that does not require pre-heat.

      If you don't have much skin and tendon with your soup bone, then add the gelatin powder as I mentioned when you soup is heated up (or you can just add gelatin powder at your regular cooking or coffee), I think it is Great Lakes brand, got it at Amazon.

      Galadraal
      05-17-2015, 02:21 PM
      Wow, thanks I will definately have to try that. I have had leaky gut issues so this is helpful also, thanks :-) I used to put the bags in a round plastic container so they stay upright. We don't hardly do the whole turkey even anymore. We do do a turkey breast with the bone for the holidays and we've been getting rotisserie chicken for dinner from the grocery store quite often; you can't really make it yourself for how cheap they sell it for. I could save those carcasses to use.

      ~~ I did remember this morning that it was a sushi bar I asked about the miso soup back in the early 80's. The Chinese restaurant we usually go to also has some Thai food. I know it's not as healthy as what we've been talking about but I used to make my own crab rangoon that is really tasty :-) I think everything is tastier AND healthier when you make it at home :-) My husband has a lady from China he works with now and he says she brings in the most wonderful egg rolls that she makes in the morning before she comes into work so they are fresh. He brought some home and they were delicious :-) I think she puts in what ever she has available like that old fire soup.

      I looked on the menu of the Chinese restaurant and they don't say what province they cook from just that they are the best in town LOL I think they changed the menu though. I used to like getting the tofu egg foo yung but it wasn't on the menu the last time I stopped in for lunch. When we were kids, I used to love going to the chinese restaurant because we'd get 3 or four entrees and share between the five of us so you could have different things. Back then, you always got the hot tea but now you have to ask for it. At school, the restaurant had a pu pu platter with the fire thing in the middle and that was amazing :-) Talking about this makes me want to go out and get some :-)

      ayj67
      05-17-2015, 05:16 PM
      Pu Pu Platter? You mean the old fashion hot pot, looks like a metal volcano with the hot soup surrounding, and you cook your meat and vegetables in the hot soup? We only do that in deep winter...

      Then, of course, winter and cold is relative. SF is cold 9 months out of a year to me. Maybe my thyroid is low 9 months out of a year since I was 20, one way or the other.

      Oh, I just look up what Pu Pu Platter is, that is Hawaii-Chinese-American... Looks like all appertizers. Looks more Indonesian and Malaysian to me than Chinese food, but then, all great street vendor food that I love when I was growing up in HK. If the restaurant owner comes from HK, we are fusion, we took all good food and make out own versions out of it.

      Mine, we took this collagen thread to another place, a foodie thread. All those finger food can be made in bulk in freeze too, you know they sell appertizers in the frozen aisle, nothing beats your own frozen food if you can cook decent. Of course, if you don't cook, and you don't know how to cook, then don't cook a big batch and freeze and suffer.

      I have a sister who cannot even cook scramble eggs without turning them black and burned. With her, I prefer her never step in the kitchen at all, so cooking in bulk and freeze is never something I would suggest to her.

      Anyway, don't wait to enjoy the benefits of collagen, you can get them in many ways, expensive cream and serum or supplement. Or kitchen scrap rendition in yummy inexpensive version. You can take it in coffee or pop a few righteous alfalfa pills that Teresa carries. MSM and Vitamin C powders are very inexpensive and it covers more than just collagen building. If you scoot back to the 6 Week thread, I was talking about MSM and Vitamin C on Friday night, and I have 2 links with pretty good details of MSM on it.

      Now, one thing that I forgot to mention is to NOT drink chlorinated water, as chlorine cancels out the MSM effects. How to avoid chlorine from tap water? Let it sits out for an hour before drinking that is one way. The other way is to squirt lemon juice in the water before drinking. I normally do not even need to worry about that, as I use Joan's prill in my water jug. I normally will wait for an hour for the prill to restructure the water before I do my second filtration with the Pi-Mag water filter to alkalize my water. So, start doing water jug and let water sit out is a good way to let chlorine dissipate. That is one of the instructions (long time ago) for the water for gold fish... Otherwise, you have to add chemical to eliminate chlorine, otherwise, the fishes die.

      Lisa A
      07-24-2015, 12:22 PM
      Do any of you know if the Type 1+3 collagens work for healing leaky gut? I've been using Great Lakes collagen and I've seen HUGE improvements. I was wondering if one of the cheaper ones that only a type 1 & 3 would work the same.
      Lisa

      Comment


      • #4
        JohannaRegina
        07-27-2015, 06:37 PM
        Originally posted by Lisa A View Post
        Do any of you know if the Type 1+3 collagens work for healing leaky gut? I've been using Great Lakes collagen and I've seen HUGE improvements. I was wondering if one of the cheaper ones that only a type 1 & 3 would work the same.
        Hi Lisa!

        I don't know whether Type 1 and 3 also helps w/ leaky gut. The brand I was using is Neocell and it's a powder. They also have pills but you would have to take a lot of them and they are big, so I like the powder. Don't know what the prices are, but I just saw for a good price here:

        http://www.drugstore.com/products/pr...la&kpid=226105

        How do you know you have leaky gut? What are the symptoms?

        J

        ayj67
        07-27-2015, 07:34 PM
        Dr. Axe has a good article for leaky guts. http://draxe.com/4-steps-to-heal-lea...mmune-disease/

        He sells his leaky guts supplement for $40 (a month's supply).


        Lisa, it turned out... using the green can Great Lakes for leaky guts is not advised. Bad leaky guts should use the Red can, bovine... The orange can Porcine can be use if the guts is not that bad... Here is article for GAPS legal or not. http://nourishingplot.com/2014/03/27...n-doesnt-work/

        They are all collagen, but the bovine is from grass fed, porcine was from conventionally raised pigs, and the green one has more chemical to make it dissolves faster. However, according to WellnessMama, the cold water dissolving type might be easier for people with severe leaky guts.http://wellnessmama.com/3058/collagen-hydrolysate/

        So, you just have to decide it base on how you feel again.

        I am not sure which type of collagen is better for leaky guts. In theory, whatever works for skin nail and hair would work for gut repair. If you read Dr. Axe's, it seems like other herbs and vitamins and minerals might need to be added.

        I do like that idea of 3 days bone broth fast, it might be a good thing to do.

        Comment


        • #5
          Lisa A
          07-28-2015, 09:56 AM
          Johanna, I have major food sensitivities. Basically I can't eat anything except meats, veggies, and a few fruits or I gain weight and get super congested. I also have digestive issues. Also, I have thyroid disease and most docs that know about leaky gut say that it's the leaky gut that actually causes ALL autoimmune diseases.

          ayj, thanks for those links! I need to check them out before I order more. I really like the green can because you can mix it with anything. I've been using a lot of the things in Dr Axe's link. It's just a slow process to healing.

          Thanks both of you for your responses!
          Lisa

          Galadraal
          07-28-2015, 07:43 PM
          I had written a long text but my computer locked up and lost it

          The pu pu platter varies with each restaurant but it is an appetizer platter for about four people with chicken wings, crab rangoon, small spare ribs, small egg rolls, etc. I love the fried foods but they aren't good for you so I haven't really had them so much lately. also, I don't care so much for the crab rangoon recipe they use locally. I have made it myself years ago and it's really quite easy :-)

          I've been using the zero water pitchers which are supossed to remove pretty much everything

          ayj67
          08-12-2015, 12:49 AM
          This year's retreat, we had Jim Caras, he is the founder of HD Direct, the Amino Sculpt that Teresa carries. Now, let me do a recap on Amino Sculpt, 2- 3 years ago when I found out my mother lost 35 lbs within 2 months (no a good thing, an 82 year old women did not try to lose weight should not lose weight) because her doctor gave her preventive anti-biotics for a flu. That totally messed up her digestive track and I think she had leaky guts because of that... As should as I found out, I call the T-Tapp office to ask Lauren if Teresa knew anything or carried anything that can target nutrient deficiency due to leaky guts.

          Lauren said Teresa just started trying the Amino Sculpt, Remag, Relyte, PSP, etc. So, I ordered a few months supply of all those. My mother's weight stablized and I do believe the combo help her extended her life for more than 6 months.

          So, finally this year, this guy came to our retreat and talked about collagen and his product.

          Lisa, regarding which type of collagen repair leaky guts, both Jim Caras and Lisa Moretti (we can trust Lisa, as she is a super researcher and a journalism, as the ghost writer for many medical research article), they both said Type 1 collagen heals leaky guts.

          I asked Jim what is the difference between Type 1 and Type 3... He said Type 3 is more or less for show... 90% of our collagen is Type 1.

          Now, I do find a table for the different type of collage... in fact, according to wikipedia, there is 16 types of collagen. The most common is Type I, Type II and Type III.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collagen

          http://www.columbia.edu/itc/hs/medic...s/collagen.jpg

          Amino Sculpt is pharmaceutical grade and has many studies for it efficiency...

          I did ask him about the difference between bone broth and Amino sculpt, he said bone broth is mostly for minerals and not the collagen.

          When I asked him about the Great Lakes versus his, of course his is medical grade with studies backing...

          I asked him about MSM + Vitamin C, he said MSM + Vitamin C gives the body the material to build collagen and it is great, but adding Amino Sculpt would even be better.

          Okay... I thought I only had 3 bottle (1 32 oz of the original and 2 bottles of the 16 oz newer type), and upon coming home, I actually have 2 bottles of 32 oz left and 4 bottles of the 16 oz. I won a bottle of 30 oz new formula and 1 bottle of Optimal Nutrition (minerals for adrenal fatigue) and a liquid ready fiber at the raffles. So, I guess I will have to use them to see how much better I can improve.

          For the last 4 months, I have been using MSM and Vitamin C to fix my skin issue.... Well, it was fixed pretty good, the make up girl ask me what did I do with my skin, as it was like butter (funny, I asked her how to get rid of the 5% residual brown spot that MSM has not fixed yet).

          I am not sure what is the deal about my luck, I also won the raffle for Plexu. I guess I need to take all the things I won instead of hording them.

          ayj67
          08-12-2015, 01:05 AM
          Teresa credited her slimmer new physique to the brain body series workout and the Amino Sculpt. Collagen enables muscle building which creates better metabolism and insulin response.

          I credit collagen on repairing my skin... Last year, my skin was true horrible... Because of adrenal fatigue and leaky guts, I must be sulfur deficient and the skin does not heal, adding to bad sleep pattern and stress, I started having fibromyalgia and continuous bad skin. The main and open sore was due to stress cause perimenopausal acne that kicks in the 7th to 10th day of my monthly cycle. With stress, I also have continuous unhealed up cold sores. 4 months ago, the MSM + Vitamin C routine helped my skin heal. Takes about 2 weeks to have skin healed up, take 3 weeks to start seeing powder matte finish effect on my face. After about a month, no more cold sores breakout, even I still feel the cold sore itches. Skin started healing before breaking out, that is just funny. I have flaky skin at the cold sores itchy spots, but never a full blown break out.

          So, today, being a good girl, I started drinking the Amino Sculpt with MSM + Vitamin C.

          Teresa told me to hydroplane the amnio sculpt to help getting it down (with the old formula). She said pour an oz of the old formula in a cup, then add 1-2 table spoon of water, so that the water will hydroplane the amino sculpt to the top, and then swallow the thing. Some some water read to wash the amino sculpt down. Then spray some B-12.

          With the new formula, it is not as nasty, so do whatever you like. I did like the new mango favor (we were all given samples at the retreat).

          Here... my recap and recollection of the collagen talk during this retreat.

          Comment


          • #6
            dg5boys
            08-12-2015, 01:35 PM
            Thanks ayj,

            I was hoping someone would give us the play-by-play of the retreat.

            Btw...is the newsletter no longer on the forums? I seemed to miss the latest one in my email.
            Blessings,

            Georgia


            ayj67
            08-12-2015, 11:56 PM
            Georgia,

            I think the newsletter still get posted regularly, it is just the retreat busyness that the August is a little late.

            healthquest
            08-13-2015, 05:36 PM
            Thanks for an amazing post Aurora. For some reason I am still not sold on the Amino Sculpt vs Great Lakes. Iam trying to get an opinion from a neutral third party. I prefer to consume supplements without additives and Amino Sculpt has all these flavors that I don't like at all. Let's see. I have abrand new bottle of Great lakes collagen, so I might consider Amino Sculpt after I finish that bottle

            ayj67
            08-13-2015, 05:58 PM
            Roshini,

            Amino Sculpt is expensive and nasty tasting (at least I am still encountering the original formula that I am entitled to my opinion). With Great Lakes, you are adding to your regular food and soup, it is not nasty. For the last two years, I am not taking those amino sculpt because of the nasty factor.

            You saw my skin, it was not horrible like last year... It is the effect of MSM and Vitamin C, so, I think when you take enough, your body can and will convert it the way it is supposed to. Just make sure you use apple cider vinegar with honey or Digestive Plus to help with digestion, so that whatever collagen you are taking are more bioavailable.

            You might want to add lysine to collagen if you have a tendency of cold sore outbreak. Collagen has a lot of arginine... You need to add Lysine to balance it out.

            ayj67
            08-13-2015, 06:02 PM
            Well, in my culture, we have a lot of chicken soup with skin. People with arthritis has a lot of chicken feet stock, I am not kidding you, 2 lbs of chicken feet to make stock for dinner. Incidentally, I saw a studies of chicken feet stock collagen on joint pain, so Type II collagen, anyone?

            All old cultures have their versions of bone broth or stew with skin, tendon and bones.

            healthquest
            08-13-2015, 10:59 PM
            I had a friend from Philippines who always bought chicken feet broth to lunch and we used to tease her!

            Today I went to Sprouts and was browsing the collagen section and they had chicken feet collagen in capsules :P,obviously 100 times more expensive than chicken feet soup.

            I tried the cherry and mango flavor of AminoSculpt and find them all disgusting, I am going to stick to great lakes for now . Jim didn't tell me how exactly the Collagen was sourced, though I asked him.He said it didn't matter what the cow was fed,but I don't feel comfortable. Thanks for the great info on ACV and Lysine . As always, you are the best knowledge resource

            ayj67
            08-13-2015, 11:41 PM
            Roshini,

            I still have more than 1.5 can of the Great Lakes bovine collagen powder... I was making the Mango jello pudding. I got the condensed Mango puree juice (might be a Filipino brand, I got it from Asian market of course, but I used to buy mango ice cream from Indian supermarket also). I mixed quite a bit of collagen after the mango juice was reconsituted (not as suggested as juice) thicker. My son said it tastes just like the Chinese dim sum mango pudding. I added heavy cream (normally we add evaporated milk on top), he said it was not needed, it is tasty as it is.

            So, if you crave for mango ice cream, consider mango cream jello pudding.

            I might try orange cream jello, yup, condensed OJ mix in water (not as much as for juice, make it more sweet), and I will add cream in that first before adding collagen. I bet you anything they are both more yummy than Amino Sculpt.

            The mango amino sculpt is actually not that bad, way better than the original formula. I still do not like the cherry favored. All cherry favored stuff tasted like cough syrup.

            Collagen does not jel well with lemonade or pinepapple, so do not try those. Collagen does well with tea latte and coffee latte, so they are good dessert possibility. Well, you cannot do coffee, you have Hashimoto. However, you can try coconut milk jello or green tea latte jello. Have you heard Tulsi with honey jello? Yes you can, you are in America.

            ayj67
            08-13-2015, 11:56 PM
            http://empoweredsustenance.com/tulsi...rmone-healing/

            https://www.google.com/search?q=gree...g83ULJu9qsY%3D

            Once you are into this, you can make them looking like pie and cake, or making mouse, jello salad mold pie or cake. The Cantonese Almond Tofu is not tofu, it is almond milk pudding cut into square with mixed fruit. Oh, I can make sweet red bean jello or black sesame jello (all kind of favored with ice cream in the Asian grocery market can be jello). Oh, I have a can of lychee in syrup, I but I can turn it into jello with rose tea.

            ayj67
            08-14-2015, 12:08 AM
            http://www.20somethingallergies.com/...ello-benefits/

            OMG, I have all these herbs and tea stuff at home to make these jello, yes, including the hibiscus, golden milk, rosehip, peppermint, nettle, etc.

            Comment


            • #7
              ayj67
              08-14-2015, 02:00 AM
              http://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/collagen-connection/

              The Collagen Connection

              by TENGLISH on APRIL 19, 2013 · 0 COMMENTS
              in NUTRITION REVIEW ARCHIVE

              Linus Pauling’s Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease

              By Jim English and Hyla Cass, MD
              Collagen is the protein that forms connective fibers in tissues such as skin, ligaments, cartilage, bones and teeth. Collagen also acts as a kind of intracellular “glue” that gives support, shape and bulk to blood vessels, bones, and organs such as the heart, kidneys and liver. Collagen fibers keep bones and blood vessels strong, and help to anchor our teeth to our gums. Collagen is also required for the repair of blood vessels, bruises, and broken bones. As the most abundant protein in the body, collagen accounts for more mass than all the other proteins put together.
              Vitamin C – along with the amino acids proline and lysine – is essential for the formation of healthy collagen. Many vitamins and minerals act as catalysts to support the manufacture of proteins. In the case of collagen, however, vitamin C is actually used up as it combines with two amino acids – lysine and proline – to form procollagen. Procollagen is then used to manufacture one of several types of collagen found in different tissues throughout the body. There are at least fourteen different types of collagen, but the most common ones are:
              Type I: Makes up the fibers found in connective tissues of the skin, bone, teeth, tendons and ligaments.
              Type II: Round fibers found in cartilage.
              Type III: Forms connective tissues that give shape and strength to organs, such as the liver, heart, kidneys, etc.
              Type IV: Forms sheets that lie between layers of cells in the blood vessels, muscles, and eye.
              Vitamin C Deficiency Equals Collagen Deficiency

              Our body is continually manufacturing collagen to maintain and repair connective tissues lost to daily wear and tear. Without vitamin C, collagen formation is disrupted, resulting in a wide variety of problems throughout the body. Scurvy, the disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, is really a process that disrupts the body’s ability to manufacture collagen and connective tissues. With scurvy, the body literally falls apart as collagen is broken down and not replaced. The joints begin to wear down as tendons shrivel and weaken. The blood vessels crumble and begin to fall apart, leading to bruising and bleeding as vessels rupture (hemorrhage) throughout the body. Teeth loosen and fall out as the gums and the connective tissues holding teeth also begin to erode. Organs, once held firmly together by connective tissues, also lose structural strength and begin to fail. In time, the various body tissues weaken, the immune system and heart give out, leading to death.
              Linus Pauling Challenges Cholesterol Theories

              In 1989, the eminent American scientist and two-time Nobel Prize winner, Linus Pauling, announced a breakthrough in how we view and treat heart disease. In “A Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease,” Linus Pauling announced that the deposits of plaque seen in atherosclerosis were not the cause of heart disease, but were actually the result of our bodies trying to repair the damage caused by long-term vitamin C deficiency. In essence, Pauling believed that heart disease is a form of scurvy, and plaque is the body’s attempt to reinforce and patch weakened blood vessels and arteries that would otherwise rupture. Pauling also showed that heart disease can be prevented or treated by taking vitamin C and other supplements.
              Plaque Deposits

              Pauling based his revolutionary theory on a number of important scientific findings. First was the discovery that plaque deposits found in human aortas are made up of a special form of cholesterol called lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a), not from ordinary LDL cholesterol. Lp(a) is a special form of LDL cholesterol that forms the thick sheets of plaque that obstruct arteries.
              Another finding central to Pauling’s theory was the observation that plaque deposits are not formed randomly throughout the circulatory system. This was first reported in the early 1950s when a Canadian doctor, G. C. Willis, MD, observed that plaque always forms nearest the heart, where blood vessels and arteries are constantly being stretched and bent, rather than being spread evenly throughout the entire cardiovascular system. Willis also noted that plaque deposits always occur in regions that are exposed to the highest blood pressures, such as the aorta, where blood is forcefully ejected from the heart.
              In 1985, a team of researchers verified that plaque only forms in areas of the artery that become damaged. Just as cracks form in a garden hose that has become weak and worn from constant bending and high-pressure, cracks form in the lining of the arterial wall. As these tiny cracks open up they expose strands of the amino acid lysine (one of the primary components of collagen) to the blood stream. It is these strands that initially attract Lp(a). Lp(a) is an especially “sticky” form of cholesterol that is attracted to lysine. Drawn to the break, Lp(a) begins to collect and attach to the exposed strands. As Lp(a) covers the lysine strands, free lysine in the blood is drawn to the growing deposit. Over time, this process continues as lysine and Lp(a) are both drawn from the blood to build ever-larger deposits of plaque. This process gradually reduces the inner diameter of the vessels and restricts its capacity to carry the blood.
              Heart Disease as Low-Level Scurvy

              Comment


              • #8
                Observing the newly described process of plaque formation, Pauling recognized a similarity to underlying processes seen in scurvy. He also saw similarities between human and animal models of atherosclerosis that pointed to a connection with scurvy. First, cardiovascular disease does not occur in any of the animals that are able to manufacture their own vitamin C. Many animals produce large amounts of vitamin C that are equivalent to human doses ranging from ten to twenty grams per day. Second, the only animals that produce Lp(a) are those which, like man, have also lost the ability to produce their own vitamin C, such as apes and guinea pigs.
                Putting all the pieces of the puzzle together, Pauling suggested that the ability to form plaque is really the body’s attempt to repair damage caused by a long-term deficiency of vitamin C. He knew that our ancestors lived in tropical regions where the diet consisted primarily of fruits and vegetables. With a daily intake estimated to be in the range of several hundred milligrams to several grams per day, our ancestors easily survived without the gene required to manufacture vitamin C. Almost unnoticed, this mutation was passed on to successive generations, and only became a problem when early humans began to spread to other regions of the world. In effect, when humankind left the “garden,” the lack of a reliable and adequate supply of dietary vitamin C led to scurvy.
                Pauling thought that scurvy was one of the greatest threats to humankind’s early survival, and believed that the loss of blood during times of vitamin C deficiency, particularly during the Ice Ages, likely brought humans close to the point of extinction.
                Plaque as a Life Saver?

                The core of Pauling’s theory is that, over time, the body developed a repair mechanism that allowed it to cope with the damage caused by chronic vitamin C deficiency. The repair mechanism is as elegant as it is simple. When arteries became weak and began to rupture, the body responded by “gluing” the damaged areas together with Lp(a) to prevent a slow death from internal bleeding. In essence, plaque is the body’s attempt to patch blood vessels damaged by low-level scurvy. Accordingly, Pauling believed that conventional “triggers” of plaque formation, such as homocysteine and oxidized cholesterol, are actually just additional symptoms of scurvy.
                Scientific Support for the Pauling Unified Theory

                Pauling’s theory was unique in that it addressed a fact never explained by older, mainstream theories. Specifically, Pauling finally explained why plaque isn’t randomly distributed throughout the body, but restricted to areas of high mechanical stress. A surprising number of animal studies have been found to support Pauling’s theory. Research conducted with animals that cannot make their own vitamin C found that when vitamin C levels are reduced, collagen production drops and blood vessels become thinner and weaker. Additional studies also confirm that when animals are deprived of vitamin C, their bodies respond by increasing blood levels of Lp(a) and forming plaque deposits to strengthen arteries and prevent vessel ruptures.
                Collagen Melts Plaque, Keeps Arteries Open

                In addition to taking vitamin C to prevent atherosclerosis, Pauling recommended a combination of vitamin C and the amino acids lysine and proline to help remove existing plaque while strengthening weak and damaged arteries. As mentioned previously, the body produces collagen from lysine and proline. Pauling reasoned that by increasing concentrations of lysine and proline in the blood, Lp(a) molecules would bind with the free lysine, rather than with the lysine strands exposed by the cracks in blood vessels.
                How Much Vitamin C Does it Take to Prevent Atherosclerosis?

                While acute scurvy can be prevented by a mere 10 mg vitamin C per day, there is no current research showing how much vitamin C might be required to prevent the atherosclerotic plaques of chronic scurvy. In his Unified Theory, Linus Pauling often recommended 3,000 to 5,000 mg per day as an effective dose. Anecdotal reports from patients using the Pauling Therapy indicate that rapid recovery is frequently the rule, not the exception, allowing many people to avoid open heart surgery and angioplasty.
                Pauling Therapy for the Reversal of Heart Disease



                Vitamin C: to bowel tolerance – as much as you can take without diarrhea. For most people this will be in the range of five to ten grams (5,000-10,000 mg.) each day. Spread this amount into two equal doses 12 hours apart. (Vitamin C prevents further cracking of the blood vessel wall – the beginning of the disease.)
                L-Proline: 3 grams twice per day (acts to release lipoprotein(a) from plaque formation and prevent further deposition of same).
                L-Lysine: 3 grams twice each day (acts to release lipoprotein(a) from plaque formation and prevent further deposition of same).
                Co-enzyme Q10: 90-180 mg. twice per day (strengthens the heart muscle).
                L-Carnitine: 3 grams twice per day (also strengthens the heart muscle).
                Niacin: Decreases production of lipoprotein(a) in the liver. Inositol hexanicotinate is a form of niacin which gives less of a problem with flushing and therefore allows for larger therapeutic doses. Begin with 250 mg. at lunch, 500 mg. at dinner and 500 mg. at bedtime the first day; then increase gradually over a few days until you reach four grams per day, or the highest dose under four grams you can tolerate. Be sure to ask your doctor for liver enzyme level tests every two months or less to be sure your liver is able to handle the dose you are taking.
                Vitamin E: 800-2400 IU per day. (Inhibits proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the walls of arteries undergoing the atherosclerotic changes.)

                References

                1. Marcoux C; Lussier-Cacan S; Davignon J; Cohn JS. Association of Lp(a) rather than integrally-bound apo(a) with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins of human subjects. Biochim Biophys Acta 1997 Jun 23;1346(3):261-74.
                2. Ensenat D, Hassan S, Reyna SV, Schafer AI, Durante W. Transforming growth factor-b1 stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell L-proline transport by inducing system A amino acid transporter 2 (SAT2) gene expression. Biochem. J. (2001) 360, (507-512)
                3. White AL; Lanford RE. Cell surface assembly of lipoprotein(a) in primary cultures of baboon hepatocytes. J Biol Chem 1994 Nov 18;269(46):28716-23.
                4. Klezovitch O; Edelstein C; Scanu AM. Evidence that the fibrinogen binding domain of Apo(a) is outside the lysine binding site of kringle IV-10: a study involving naturally occurring lysine binding defective lipoprotein(a) phenotypes. J Clin Invest 1996 Jul 1;98(1):185-91.
                5. Boonmark NW; Lou XJ; Yang ZJ; Schwartz K; Zhang JL; Rubin EM; Lawn RM. Modification of apolipoprotein(a) lysine binding site reduces atherosclerosis in transgenic mice. J Clin Invest 1997 Aug 1;100(3):558-64.
                6. Phillips J; Roberts G; Bolger C; el Baghdady A; Bouchier-Hayes D; Farrell M; Collins P. Lipoprotein (a): a potential biological marker for unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Neurosurgery 1997 May;40(5):1112-5; discussion 1115-7.
                7. Stubbs P; Seed M; Moseley D; O’Connor B; Collinson P; Noble M. A prospective study of the role of lipoprotein(a) in the pathogenesis of unstable angina. Eur Heart J 1997 Apr;18(4):603-7.
                8. Shinozaki K; Kambayashi J; Kawasaki T; Uemura Y; Sakon M; Shiba E; Shibuya T; Nakamura T; Mori T. The long-term effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and lipids in patients with vascular disease. J Atheroscler Thromb 1996;2(2):107-9.
                9. McCully KS, Homocysteine metabolism in scurvy, growth and arteriosclerosis. Nature 1971;231:391-392.
                10. Pauling L, Rath M. Pro. Nat. Acad. Sci USA, Vol 87, pp 9388-9390, Dec 1990.
                11. Carr AC, Frei B. Toward a new recommended dietary allowance for vitamin C based on antioxidant and health effects in humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1999;69(6):1086-1107.
                12. Simon JA, Hudes ES. Serum ascorbic acid and gallbladder disease prevalence among US adults: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Arch Intern Med. 2000;160(7):931-936.
                13. Stephen R, Utecht T. Scurvy identified in the emergency department: a case report. Journal of Emerg Med. 2001;21(3):235-237.
                14. Cameron E, Pauling L. Supplemental ascorbate in the supportive treatment of cancer: Prolongation of survival times in terminal human cancer. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1976;73(10):3685-3689.
                Tagged as: Collagen

                ayj67
                08-14-2015, 02:25 AM
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1153502/

                http://www.ctds.info/mvp1.html Interesting articles linking up stress leading to low magnesium, leading to reduction in connective collagen to heart valve prolapses.

                Stress causes low magnesium that leads to collagen deficiency...

                http://www.livestrong.com/article/42...-heart-valves/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Galadraal
                  08-14-2015, 11:55 AM
                  Thank you for sharing your knowledge

                  http://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/collagen-connection/

                  The Collagen Connection

                  by TENGLISH on APRIL 19, 2013 · 0 COMMENTS
                  in NUTRITION REVIEW ARCHIVE

                  Linus Pauling’s Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease

                  By Jim English and Hyla Cass, MD
                  Collagen is the protein that forms connective fibers in tissues such as skin, ligaments, cartilage, bones and teeth. Collagen also acts as a kind of intracellular “glue” that gives support, shape and bulk to blood vessels, bones, and organs such as the heart, kidneys and liver. Collagen fibers keep bones and blood vessels strong, and help to anchor our teeth to our gums. Collagen is also required for the repair of blood vessels, bruises, and broken bones. As the most abundant protein in the body, collagen accounts for more mass than all the other proteins put together.
                  Vitamin C – along with the amino acids proline and lysine – is essential for the formation of healthy collagen. Many vitamins and minerals act as catalysts to support the manufacture of proteins. In the case of collagen, however, vitamin C is actually used up as it combines with two amino acids – lysine and proline – to form procollagen. Procollagen is then used to manufacture one of several types of collagen found in different tissues throughout the body. There are at least fourteen different types of collagen, but the most common ones are:
                  Type I: Makes up the fibers found in connective tissues of the skin, bone, teeth, tendons and ligaments.
                  Type II: Round fibers found in cartilage.
                  Type III: Forms connective tissues that give shape and strength to organs, such as the liver, heart, kidneys, etc.
                  Type IV: Forms sheets that lie between layers of cells in the blood vessels, muscles, and eye.
                  Vitamin C Deficiency Equals Collagen Deficiency

                  Our body is continually manufacturing collagen to maintain and repair connective tissues lost to daily wear and tear. Without vitamin C, collagen formation is disrupted, resulting in a wide variety of problems throughout the body. Scurvy, the disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, is really a process that disrupts the body’s ability to manufacture collagen and connective tissues. With scurvy, the body literally falls apart as collagen is broken down and not replaced. The joints begin to wear down as tendons shrivel and weaken. The blood vessels crumble and begin to fall apart, leading to bruising and bleeding as vessels rupture (hemorrhage) throughout the body. Teeth loosen and fall out as the gums and the connective tissues holding teeth also begin to erode. Organs, once held firmly together by connective tissues, also lose structural strength and begin to fail. In time, the various body tissues weaken, the immune system and heart give out, leading to death.
                  Linus Pauling Challenges Cholesterol Theories

                  In 1989, the eminent American scientist and two-time Nobel Prize winner, Linus Pauling, announced a breakthrough in how we view and treat heart disease. In “A Unified Theory of Human Cardiovascular Disease,” Linus Pauling announced that the deposits of plaque seen in atherosclerosis were not the cause of heart disease, but were actually the result of our bodies trying to repair the damage caused by long-term vitamin C deficiency. In essence, Pauling believed that heart disease is a form of scurvy, and plaque is the body’s attempt to reinforce and patch weakened blood vessels and arteries that would otherwise rupture. Pauling also showed that heart disease can be prevented or treated by taking vitamin C and other supplements.
                  Plaque Deposits

                  Pauling based his revolutionary theory on a number of important scientific findings. First was the discovery that plaque deposits found in human aortas are made up of a special form of cholesterol called lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a), not from ordinary LDL cholesterol. Lp(a) is a special form of LDL cholesterol that forms the thick sheets of plaque that obstruct arteries.
                  Another finding central to Pauling’s theory was the observation that plaque deposits are not formed randomly throughout the circulatory system. This was first reported in the early 1950s when a Canadian doctor, G. C. Willis, MD, observed that plaque always forms nearest the heart, where blood vessels and arteries are constantly being stretched and bent, rather than being spread evenly throughout the entire cardiovascular system. Willis also noted that plaque deposits always occur in regions that are exposed to the highest blood pressures, such as the aorta, where blood is forcefully ejected from the heart.
                  In 1985, a team of researchers verified that plaque only forms in areas of the artery that become damaged. Just as cracks form in a garden hose that has become weak and worn from constant bending and high-pressure, cracks form in the lining of the arterial wall. As these tiny cracks open up they expose strands of the amino acid lysine (one of the primary components of collagen) to the blood stream. It is these strands that initially attract Lp(a). Lp(a) is an especially “sticky” form of cholesterol that is attracted to lysine. Drawn to the break, Lp(a) begins to collect and attach to the exposed strands. As Lp(a) covers the lysine strands, free lysine in the blood is drawn to the growing deposit. Over time, this process continues as lysine and Lp(a) are both drawn from the blood to build ever-larger deposits of plaque. This process gradually reduces the inner diameter of the vessels and restricts its capacity to carry the blood.
                  Heart Disease as Low-Level Scurvy

                  Observing the newly described process of plaque formation, Pauling recognized a similarity to underlying processes seen in scurvy. He also saw similarities between human and animal models of atherosclerosis that pointed to a connection with scurvy. First, cardiovascular disease does not occur in any of the animals that are able to manufacture their own vitamin C. Many animals produce large amounts of vitamin C that are equivalent to human doses ranging from ten to twenty grams per day. Second, the only animals that produce Lp(a) are those which, like man, have also lost the ability to produce their own vitamin C, such as apes and guinea pigs.
                  Putting all the pieces of the puzzle together, Pauling suggested that the ability to form plaque is really the body’s attempt to repair damage caused by a long-term deficiency of vitamin C. He knew that our ancestors lived in tropical regions where the diet consisted primarily of fruits and vegetables. With a daily intake estimated to be in the range of several hundred milligrams to several grams per day, our ancestors easily survived without the gene required to manufacture vitamin C. Almost unnoticed, this mutation was passed on to successive generations, and only became a problem when early humans began to spread to other regions of the world. In effect, when humankind left the “garden,” the lack of a reliable and adequate supply of dietary vitamin C led to scurvy.
                  Pauling thought that scurvy was one of the greatest threats to humankind’s early survival, and believed that the loss of blood during times of vitamin C deficiency, particularly during the Ice Ages, likely brought humans close to the point of extinction.
                  Plaque as a Life Saver?

                  The core of Pauling’s theory is that, over time, the body developed a repair mechanism that allowed it to cope with the damage caused by chronic vitamin C deficiency. The repair mechanism is as elegant as it is simple. When arteries became weak and began to rupture, the body responded by “gluing” the damaged areas together with Lp(a) to prevent a slow death from internal bleeding. In essence, plaque is the body’s attempt to patch blood vessels damaged by low-level scurvy. Accordingly, Pauling believed that conventional “triggers” of plaque formation, such as homocysteine and oxidized cholesterol, are actually just additional symptoms of scurvy.
                  Scientific Support for the Pauling Unified Theory

                  Pauling’s theory was unique in that it addressed a fact never explained by older, mainstream theories. Specifically, Pauling finally explained why plaque isn’t randomly distributed throughout the body, but restricted to areas of high mechanical stress. A surprising number of animal studies have been found to support Pauling’s theory. Research conducted with animals that cannot make their own vitamin C found that when vitamin C levels are reduced, collagen production drops and blood vessels become thinner and weaker. Additional studies also confirm that when animals are deprived of vitamin C, their bodies respond by increasing blood levels of Lp(a) and forming plaque deposits to strengthen arteries and prevent vessel ruptures.
                  Collagen Melts Plaque, Keeps Arteries Open

                  In addition to taking vitamin C to prevent atherosclerosis, Pauling recommended a combination of vitamin C and the amino acids lysine and proline to help remove existing plaque while strengthening weak and damaged arteries. As mentioned previously, the body produces collagen from lysine and proline. Pauling reasoned that by increasing concentrations of lysine and proline in the blood, Lp(a) molecules would bind with the free lysine, rather than with the lysine strands exposed by the cracks in blood vessels.
                  How Much Vitamin C Does it Take to Prevent Atherosclerosis?

                  While acute scurvy can be prevented by a mere 10 mg vitamin C per day, there is no current research showing how much vitamin C might be required to prevent the atherosclerotic plaques of chronic scurvy. In his Unified Theory, Linus Pauling often recommended 3,000 to 5,000 mg per day as an effective dose. Anecdotal reports from patients using the Pauling Therapy indicate that rapid recovery is frequently the rule, not the exception, allowing many people to avoid open heart surgery and angioplasty.
                  Pauling Therapy for the Reversal of Heart Disease



                  Vitamin C: to bowel tolerance – as much as you can take without diarrhea. For most people this will be in the range of five to ten grams (5,000-10,000 mg.) each day. Spread this amount into two equal doses 12 hours apart. (Vitamin C prevents further cracking of the blood vessel wall – the beginning of the disease.)
                  L-Proline: 3 grams twice per day (acts to release lipoprotein(a) from plaque formation and prevent further deposition of same).
                  L-Lysine: 3 grams twice each day (acts to release lipoprotein(a) from plaque formation and prevent further deposition of same).
                  Co-enzyme Q10: 90-180 mg. twice per day (strengthens the heart muscle).
                  L-Carnitine: 3 grams twice per day (also strengthens the heart muscle).
                  Niacin: Decreases production of lipoprotein(a) in the liver. Inositol hexanicotinate is a form of niacin which gives less of a problem with flushing and therefore allows for larger therapeutic doses. Begin with 250 mg. at lunch, 500 mg. at dinner and 500 mg. at bedtime the first day; then increase gradually over a few days until you reach four grams per day, or the highest dose under four grams you can tolerate. Be sure to ask your doctor for liver enzyme level tests every two months or less to be sure your liver is able to handle the dose you are taking.
                  Vitamin E: 800-2400 IU per day. (Inhibits proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the walls of arteries undergoing the atherosclerotic changes.)

                  Wow! so helpful THANK you

                  dg5boys
                  08-14-2015, 12:00 PM
                  Wow...ayj, that's a lot of info there! I've used Great Lakes HC and found it hard on my stomach. Never used AminoSculpt, but used Sweetamine and found it ok for inflammation. Watch the videos...geek overload, but I do thinks he's right.

                  We used to take Twin Lakes Liquid Aminos back in the stone ages and early fitness culture!..lol. They tasted horrible also. But the amino profile is still pretty sweet!

                  Hopefully this contribution has kept the research relevant and the thread productive.
                  Blessings,

                  Georgia


                  ayj67
                  08-14-2015, 01:05 PM
                  Georgia,

                  Someone at the Retreat shared with me that she was having heart valve issue, and had a few fainting spell on the street. Doctors were suggesting heart surgery and she was scared to death. She did not even know she had heart murmur.

                  The collagen type research has brought my attention to the collagen type and thickness affects the flexibility, fuction and if the heart valve can complete close.

                  Also, there is an interesting statement there about stress depletes or destroy collagen. Ain't it true? Stress out women have thin out face fat (no collagen on the face).

                  Now, then comes the stress depleted magnesium, and magnesium makes the heart murmur symptoms worse, and calcium deposits at heart valves make the heart valves not flexible, and then of course, low in magnesium cause calcium deposits in places that you don't want including heart valves. That is calcified heart valve.

                  I saw another research saying the heart valve has mostly Type I collagen (it has Type III and Type V too) when it is working properly. If it has higher Type III and Type V collagen than Type I, the heart valve needs replacement.

                  I think I ought to put these things all in one place. As you know the Forum is a the research central, here is where most of the research begins.

                  dg5boys
                  08-14-2015, 03:32 PM
                  Heart valve calcification could mean low vitamin K2 as well.

                  My skin is the pits. Trying to get adrenals, low cortisol, and a touch of thyroid under control. I feel so much better than I did last summer. At some point I'm gonna try the AminoSculpt. Perhaps when I'm finished with all the Dr. Wilson products!

                  Ayj, you are so right...typing on a Kindle is hard!
                  Last edited by dg5boys; 08-14-2015, 03:35 PM.
                  Blessings,

                  Georgia


                  ayj67
                  08-14-2015, 03:36 PM
                  Originally posted by dg5boys View Post
                  Heart valve calcification could mean low vitamin K2 as well.

                  My skin is the pits. Trying to get adrenals, low cortisol, and a touch of thyroid under control. I feel so much better than I did last summer. At some point I'm gonna try the AminoSculpt. Perhaps when I'm finished with all the Dr. Wilson products!

                  Ayj, you are so right...typing on a Kindle is hard!
                  The auto-correct is a nightmare!

                  ayj67
                  08-14-2015, 03:39 PM
                  Do you want to try my last 4 months of experiment? Heal my skin really good. 5 gram of MSM to 2.5 gram of Vitamin C (no fillers for either thing). I use 1 dose per day for the first month, then two doses, kind of 12 hours apart for the last 3 months. If you have detox reaction, start with 1 gram MSM and half gram of vitamin C. It is nasty, but then it is cheap and it works.

                  healthquest
                  08-14-2015, 04:29 PM
                  What brand MSM did you use Aurora? I am trying to find a good natural Vitamin C too

                  ayj67
                  08-14-2015, 07:32 PM
                  Forum ate my post again!

                  I use Jarrow formula for MSM. I used Trader Joe's Vitamin C (ascorbic acid). Both have no fillers, nothing else.

                  MSM drive medication and nutrient deeper into cellular level. So, you might need to reduce your meds. However, if you increase your good minerals and nutrients, MSM will drive them deeper and your supplements will be more effective. MSM detoxes, so if you still have a lot of med and toxins, you will need to use lower dosage and gradually increase to prevent detox flu.

                  Galadraal
                  08-15-2015, 02:33 PM
                  Cool with the MSM, I need to start taking it again :-) I used to take so many supplements and then I forget why I was taking them so I've stopped taking most of the ones I used to. I take mostly NutraMetrix which is a powder that you put a capful in 2 ounces of water so it's much better absorbed. I did buy the liquid multi at the Retreat but put it in a cabinet and kept forgetting to take it so I put it out on the counter. My husband hates clutter so I try to clear it out for him but it keeps coming back :-( I know it's bad feng shui and I need to get control of my mess LOL

                  Lisa A
                  08-17-2015, 01:23 PM
                  Wow! Thanks for all this info, ayj! Great stuff!
                  Lisa

                  soliloquy72
                  08-17-2015, 02:04 PM
                  I didn't read past the first page so I apologize if the thread has moved beyond the OP.

                  I take collagen hydrosylate from Great Lakes Gelatin. (The name sounds scary but it's simply gelatin from grass-fed cattle that has been soaked with lime.) I take it to help my metabolism (which is slow) and to help heal the tendonitis I have in my legs. I haven't noticed any bulking but I'm not super faithful about taking it daily, probably 3x a week. The trainers that I have seen recommend collagen do recommend it with orange juice, coconut water, and a little salt, to be sipped during exercise as an energy drink. If you don't like drinking things other than plain water during exercise (I sure don't) then you could drink some immediately before and after a workout.
                  Lisa-- 42, homeschooling mom to 4 great kids and pregnant with baby #5!

                  JohannaRegina
                  08-18-2015, 06:22 PM
                  Hi Ayj!

                  Have you tried Lysine for your cold sores? I have met so many people with cold sores and almost all of them ate a lot of nuts, full of Arginine. I suggested taking Lysine (pills) That usually helps a lot!

                  So interesting that Teresa also had a collagen topic in her retreat!

                  I must say, when I did my little experiment with taking it daily, I:

                  - gained weight. Maybe had to do with improved insulin sensitivity, but I am already pretty insulin sensitive. In Diana Schwarzbein's book she mentions that if you are insulin sensitive and follow her program for healing, you are the most likely to gain weight in the beginning.....

                  - got heartburn. I attribute that to the orange juice I was mixing the collagen in though.

                  - my skin was BEAUTIFUL. Soft and radiant. I would like that very much but have to figure out a way to take collagen without getting some of the other not so good effects I had.

                  I will look into some of the products you mentioned. I really think that collagen is a major supplement player and can make a huge difference unlike some other products.

                  Thanks for the recap!
                  J

                  ayj67
                  08-18-2015, 08:51 PM
                  Johanna,

                  It is not a coincidence, Teresa has been looking into collagen for a long time. Alfalfa builds collagen too, she mentioned that in her very very old seminar for the super skin (CD), but the muscle building effect is not drastic. As when i first started Alfalfa, my skin got supple within a month.

                  She has been using Amino Sculpt for 2-3 years... I think I found out my mother's issue in the summer of 2013, and I have some of the bottle's of Amino Sculpt since then.

                  The MSM and Vitamin C, but in much lower dose was from Teresa... Jan 2012 Retreat. I just did not remember she mentioned collagen effect at all, I think she said energy boost.

                  In a way MSM and Vitamin C will boost energy, in the way of detox, good for the liver and my oxygen to the cells.

                  I started having dry and crepey look on my skin last year (in addition to those unhealing issues), now they are gone. I mean in addition to the face, the arms and legs... They are smooth and supple now.

                  Regarding cold sores, sometimes it is arginine and lysine imbalance, but sometimes, maybe it is the skin structure and detox. As I told you, since I started supplementing MSM and Vitamin C, there is no more breakouts, as skin started healing before it completely breaks out. Since I started amino sculpt, I add a little more lysine, as arginine was higher on the ingredient order than lysine... I think I broke out with cold sore with Amino Sculpt before, as I am just a high cold sore tendency person.

                  I was not looking into the vanity factor of MSM and Vitamin C, I was trying to kill cancers cells in my body with the protocol. I don't want to know if I have any, but if there is some, I did not know yet, and MSM and Vitamin C probably had controlled them if they are not all killed.

                  Now, Amino Sculpt was big now in weight loss and muscle builder community. In addition, it is well received at nursing home for old people and for nutrition with cancer patient. Maybe you don't need to take it everyday, maybe you need to take a lower dosage. You can eat way less protein, as remember I told you about the Gelatin book I read about the WWI study on if collagen can replace dietary protein. The fact is, it cannot really completely replace dietary protein, but it can minimize dietary protein intake to keep a person striving and health. Collagen is a protein preserving substance.

                  Remember, Teresa is looking into supplement for menopause and post menopause, or people heading to the geriatric group (LOL, I am heading there too, slowly but steadily). The failure to build new muscles is the bane of aging and the reduction in estrogen and testosterone... Building muscles to burn fat is the basic principle of T-Tapp, she has to find a way for senior to build muscles, in addition to Senior Fit.

                  Anyway, to slow down and halt the aging process is far easier than trying to reverse it. Reversing will need high dosage and more persistent effort. Slowing it down and halting it can be done is a easy and haphazard manner. You are 10 years younger than me, and I expect your to look forever 28 going forward.

                  Karenlolly
                  03-28-2016, 07:53 PM
                  Thanks Aurora! I will have to read several times so much good information.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello everybody! I just started using collagen, the Neocell brand, which I saw another person had used. I am pescatarian, so I don't eat meat but I do use animal products like dairy, eggs and I do eat fish. I decided to give collagen a try because I have never heard anything bad!
                    So, I did my research, saw that its better on an empty stomach and so the first time, thats what I did. The second time I had it, I had to quickly get out of the house so I didn't have a chance to drink my coffee and Collagen before eating. I had some discomfort in my belly, but I realized I think I had some discomfort the first time. I have been scouring the internet thinking maybe because I haven't eaten meat for like 6 years, my body might be having some issues processing the collagen
                    Other than that things are going fine with it, but I want to be sure that I should still be using it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Camilla, This thread is a bit old so I would copy your message to a NEW post in maybe the nutrition or general group so it can be seen better.

                      I cannot use Neocell Collagen either, but I haven't tried another brand. It makes me nauseous which is weird because collagen is supposed to be good for gut health. I have put it in my coffee, taken it alone and either get queasy or stomachache. I haven't tried putting it in something like yogurt though. I have IBS so I am not sure if that is part of it.

                      I know this wasn't very helpful, but you are not alone. Oh also, I looked on the internet for a reasons that collagen makes my stomach icky and found nothing.

                      Alisa
                      Mother and Grandmother to a 7 y.o. grandson and 3 y.o. granddaughter
                      T-Tapp Beginner 4/15/18
                      Nutrition and Natural Health Enthusiast
                      Studying Mental Health Counseling

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X