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Thread: Brian Peskin Contradicted..opinions sought.

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    Default Brian Peskin Contradicted..opinions sought.

    Hi,
    Like many of you here i was i was very interested in what Brian Peskin had to say about cancer.
    I have recently been treated for thyroid cancer.
    I started following Brian Peskin's advice & reduced carbohydrates in my diet added more protein & became strictly organic.
    I also stated taking 2 teaspoons of organic, unrefined Safflower oil to 1 teaspoon of organic, unrefined Flax oil. I started this about a month ago, with no apparent improvement in skin etc. if anything my immunity seems a little suppressed, but that could be due to my recent radiation treatment for cancer.

    I have come across the following article which pretty much seems to discount most of what Brian Peskin claims.
    This has me very concerned as i certainly don't want to increase my chances of cancer returning, I was hoping Peskin's method would help to stop that.

    This is the link to the article
    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles...ted-oils.shtml

    But i have copied & pasted it below.

    I have highlighted some of the more interesting claims. This article claims that the the hydrogenation of the oils makes them less like likely to cause cancer, i am sure Peskin claims it is the hydrogenation that makes the oils more toxic & that is why he recommends organic, unrefined oils.

    It is so hard to know who to believe, you want to make the right decision when it comes to your health & avoiding a recurrence of something like cancer, but who is to say that Peskin is right & Peat is wrong, they have completely opposing views when it comes to EFAs.
    I am now wondering whether to take my oils tonight.

    Unsaturated Vegetable Oils: Toxic

    • GLOSSARY:

    • Immunodeficiency (weakness of the immune system) can take many forms. AIDS, for example, refers to an immunodeficiency which is "acquired," rather than "inborn." Radiation and vegetable oils can cause "acquired immunodeficiency." Unsaturated oils, especially polyunsaturates, weaken the immune system's function in ways that are similar to the damage caused by radiation, hormone imbalance, cancer, aging, or viral infections. The media discuss sexually transmitted and drug-induced immunodeficiency, but it isn't yet considered polite to discuss vegetable oil-induced immunodeficiency.

    • Unsaturated oils: When an oil is saturated, that means that the molecule has all the hydrogen atoms it can hold. Unsaturation means that some hydrogen atoms have been removed, and this opens the structure of the molecule in a way that makes it susceptible to attack by free radicals.

    • Free radicals are reactive molecular fragments that occur even in healthy cells, and can damage the cell. When unsaturated oils are exposed to free radicals they can create chain reactions of free radicals that spread the damage in the cell, and contribute to the cell's aging.

    • Rancidity of oils occurs when they are exposed to oxygen, in the body just as in the bottle. Harmful free radicals are formed, and oxygen is used up.

    • Essential fatty acids (EFA) are, according to the textbooks, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, and they are supposed to have the status of "vitamins," which must be taken in the diet to make life possible. However, we are able to synthesize our own unsaturated fats when we don't eat the "EFA," so they are not "essential." The term thus appears to be a misnomer. [M. E. Hanke, "Biochemistry," Encycl. Brit. Book of the Year, 1948.]

    • Q: You say vegetable oils are hazardous to your health. What vegetable oils are you talking about?

    • Mainly, I'm referring to soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, canola, sesame oil, sunflower seed oil, palm oil, and any others that are labeled as "unsaturated" or "polyunsaturated." Almond oil, which is used in many cosmetics, is very unsaturated.

    • Chemically, the material that makes these oils very toxic is the polyunsaturated fat itself. These unsaturated oils are found in very high concentrations in many seeds, and in the fats of animals that have eaten a diet containing them. The fresh oils, whether cold pressed or consumed as part of the living plant material, are intrinsically toxic, and it is not any special industrial treatment that makes them toxic. Since these oils occur in other parts of plants at lower concentration, and in the animals which eat the plants, it is impossible to eat a diet which lacks them, unless special foods are prepared in the laboratory.

    • These toxic oils are sometimes called the "essential fatty acids" or "vitamin F," but this concept of the oils as essential nutrients was clearly disproved over 50 years ago.

    • Linoleic and linolenic acids, the "essential fatty acids," and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are now fed to pigs to fatten them, in the form of corn and soy beans, cause the animals' fat to be chemically equivalent to vegetable oil. In the late 1940s, chemical toxins were used to suppress the thyroid function of pigs, to make them get fatter while consuming less food. When that was found to be carcinogenic, it was then found that corn and soy beans had the same antithyroid effect, causing the animals to be fattened at low cost. The animals' fat becomes chemically similar to the fats in their food, causing it to be equally toxic, and equally fattening.

    • These oils are derived from seeds, but their abundance in some meat has led to a lot of confusion about "animal fats." Many researchers still refer to lard as a "saturated fat," but this is simply incorrect when pigs are fed soybeans and corn.

    • Q: How are these oils hazardous to your health?

    • Ultimately, all systems of the body are harmed by an excess of these oils. There are two reasons for this. One is that the plants produce the oils for protection, not only to store energy for the germination of the seed. To defend the seeds from the animals that would eat them, the oils block the digestive enzymes in the animals' stomachs. Digestion is one of our most basic functions, and evolution has built many other systems by using variations of that system; as a result, all of these systems are damaged by the substances which damage the digestive system.

    • The other reason is that the seeds are designed to germinate in early spring, so their energy stores must be accessible when the temperatures are cool, and they normally don't have to remain viable through the hot summer months. Unsaturated oils are liquid when they are cold, and this is necessary for any organism that lives at low temperatures. For example, fish in cold water would be stiff if they contained saturated fats. These oils easily get rancid (spontaneously oxidizing) when they are warm and exposed to oxygen. Seeds contain a small amount of vitamin E to delay rancidity. When the oils are stored in our tissues, they are much warmer, and more directly exposed to oxygen, than they would be in the seeds, and so their tendency to oxidize is very great. These oxidative processes can damage enzymes and other parts of cells, and especially their ability to produce energy.

    • The enzymes which break down proteins are inhibited by unsaturated fats, and these enzymes are needed not only for digestion, but also for production of thyroid hormones, clot removal, immunity, and the general adaptability of cells. The risks of abnormal blood clotting, inflammation, immune deficiency, shock, aging, obesity, and cancer are increased. Thyroid and progesterone are decreased. Since the unsaturated oils block protein digestion in the stomach, we can be malnourished even while "eating well."

    • Plants produce many protective substances to repel or injure insects and other animals that eat them. They produce their own pesticides. The oils in seeds have this function. On top of this natural toxicity, the plants are sprayed with industrial pesticides, which can concentrate in the seed oils.

    • It isn't the quantity of these polyunsaturated oils which governs the harm they do, but the relationship between them and the saturated fats. Obesity, free radical production, the formation of age pigment, blood clotting, inflammation, immunity, and energy production are all responsive to the ratio of unsaturated fats to saturated fats, and the higher this ratio is, the greater the probability of harm there is.

    • There are interesting interactions between these oils and estrogen. For example, puberty occurs at an earlier age if estrogen is high, or if these oils are more abundant in the diet. This is probably a factor in the development of cancer.

    • All systems of the body are harmed by an excess of these oils. There are three main kinds of damage: one, hormonal imbalances, two, damage to the immune system, and three, oxidative damage.

    • Q: How do they cause hormonal imbalances?

    • There are many changes in hormones caused by unsaturated fats. Their best understood effect is their interference with the function of the thyroid gland. Unsaturated oils block thyroid hormone secretion, its movement in the circulatory system, and the response of tissues to the hormone. When the thyroid hormone is deficient, the body is generally exposed to increased levels of estrogen. The thyroid hormone is essential for making the "protective hormones" progesterone and pregnenolone, so these hormones are lowered when anything interferes with the function of the thyroid. The thyroid hormone is required for using and eliminating cholesterol, so cholesterol is likely to be raised by anything which blocks the thyroid function. [B. Barnes and L. Galton, Hypothyroidism, 1976, and 1994 references.]

    • Q: How do they damage the immune system?

    • Vegetable oil is recognized as a drug for knocking out the immune system. Vegetable oil emulsions were used to nourish cancer patients, but it was discovered that the unsaturated oils were suppressing their immune systems. The same products, in which vegetable oil is emulsified with water for intravenous injection, are now marketed specifically for the purpose of suppressing immunity in patients who have had organ transplants. Using the oils in foods has the same harmful effect on the immune system. [E. A. Mascioli, et al.,Lipids 22(6) 421, 1987.] Unsaturated fats directly kill white blood cells. [C. J. Meade and J. Martin, Adv. Lipid Res., 127, 1978.]

    • Q: How do they cause oxidative damage?

    • Unsaturated oils get rancid when exposed to air; that is called oxidation, and it is the same process that occurs when oil paint "dries." Free radicals are produced in the process.

    • This process is accelerated at higher temperatures. The free radicals produced in this process react with parts of cells, such as molecules of DNA and protein and may become attached to those molecules, causing abnormalities of structure and function.

    • Q: What if I eat only organically grown vegetable oils?

    • Even without the addition of agricultural chemicals, an excess of unsaturated vegetable oils damages the human body. Cancer can't occur, unless there are unsaturated oils in the diet. [C. Ip, et al., Cancer Res. 45, 1985.] Alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver cannot occur unless there are unsaturated oils in the diet. [Nanji and French, Life Sciences. 44, 1989.] Heart disease can be produced by unsaturated oils, and prevented by adding saturated oils to the diet. [J. K. G. Kramer, et al., Lipids 17, 372, 1983.]

    • Q. What oils are safe?

    • Coconut and olive oil are the only vegetable oils that are really safe, but butter and lamb fat, which are highly saturated, are generally very safe (except when the animals have been poisoned). Coconut oil is unique in its ability to prevent weight-gain or cure obesity, by stimulating metabolism. It is quickly metabolized, and functions in some ways as an antioxidant. Olive oil, though it is somewhat fattening, is less fattening than corn or soy oil, and contains an

    • antioxidant which makes it protective against heart disease and cancer.

    • Israel had the world's highest incidence of breast cancer when they allowed the insecticide lindane to be used in dairies, and the cancer rate decreased immediately after the government prohibited its use. The United States has fairly good laws to control the use of cancer-causing agents in the food supply, but they are not vigorously enforced. Certain cancers are several times more common among corn farmers than among other farmers, presumably because corn "requires" the use of more pesticides. This probably makes corn oil's toxicity greater than it would be otherwise, but even the pure, organically grown material is toxic, because of its intrinsic unsaturation.

    • In the United States, lard is toxic because the pigs are fed large quantities of corn and soy beans. Besides the intrinsic toxicity of the seed oils, they are contaminated with agricultural chemicals. Corn farmers have a very high incidence of cancer, presumably because of the pesticides they use on their crop.

    • Q: But aren't "tropical oils" bad for us?

    • In general, tropical oils are much more healthful than oils produced in a cold climate. This is because tropical plants live at a temperature that is close to our natural body temperature. Tropical oils are stable at high temperatures. When we eat tropical oils, they don't get rancid in our tissues as the cold-climate seed oils, such as corn oil, safflower oil and soy oil, do. [R.B. Wolf, J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 59, 230, 1982; R. Wolfe, Chem 121, Univ. of Oregon, 1986.]

    • When added to a balanced diet, coconut oil slightly lowers the cholesterol level, which is exactly what is expected when a dietary change raises thyroid function. This same increase in thyroid function and metabolic rate explains why people and animals that regularly eat coconut oil are lean, and remarkably free of heart disease and cancer.

    • Although I don't recommend "palm oil" as a food, because I think it is less stable than coconut oil, some studies show that it contains valuable nutrients. For example, it contains antioxidants similar to vitamin E, which lowers both LDL cholesterol and a platelet clotting factor. [B. A. Bradlow, University of Illinois, Chicago; Science News 139, 268, 1991.] Coconut oil and other tropical oils also contain some hormones that are related to pregnenolone or progesterone.

    • Q: Isn't coconut oil fattening?

    • Coconut oil is the least fattening of all the oils. Pig farmers tried to use it to fatten their animals, but when it was added to the animal feed, coconut oil made the pigs lean [See Encycl. Brit. Book of the Year, 1946].

    • Q: What about olive oil? Isn't it more fattening than other vegetable oils?

    • In this case, as with coconut oil, "fattening" has more to do with your ability to burn calories than with the caloric value of the oil. Olive oil has a few more calories per quart than corn or soy oil, but since it doesn't damage our ability to burn calories as much as the unsaturated oils do, it is less fattening. Extra virgin olive oil is the best grade, and contains an antioxidant that protects against cancer and heart disease. [1994, Curr. Conts.]

    • Q: Is "light" olive oil okay?

    • No. Now and then someone learns how to make a profit from waste material. "Knotty pine" boards were changed from a discarded material to a valued decorative material by a little marketing skill. Light olive oil is a low grade material which sometimes has a rancid smell and probably shouldn't be used as food.

    • Q: Is margarine okay?

    • There are several problems with margarine. The manufacturing process introduces some toxins, including a unique type of fat which has been associated with heart disease. [Sci. News, 1974; 1991.] There are likely to be dyes and preservatives added to margarine. And newer products contain new chemicals that haven't been in use long enough to know whether they are safe.

    • However, the basic hardening process, hydrogenation of the oils, has been found to make the oils less likely to cause cancer. If I had to choose between eating ordinary corn oil or corn oil that was 100% saturated, to make a hard margarine, I would choose the hard margarine, because it resists oxidation, isn't suppressive to the thyroid gland, and doesn't cause cancer.

    • Q: What about butter?

    • Butter contains natural vitamin A and D and some beneficial natural hormones. It is less fattening than the unsaturated oils. There is much less cholesterol in an ounce of butter than in a lean chicken breast [about 1/5 as much cholesterol in fat as in lean meat on a calorie basis, according to R. Reiser of Texas A & M Univ., 1979.].

    • Q: Are fish oils good for you?

    • Some of the unsaturated fats in fish are definitely less toxic than those in corn oil or soy oil, but that doesn't mean they are safe. Fifty years ago, it was found that a large amount of cod liver oil in dogs' diet increased their death rate from cancer by 20 times, from the usual 5% to 100%. A diet rich in fish oil causes intense production of toxic lipid peroxides, and has been observed to reduce a man's sperm count to zero. [H. Sinclair, Prog. Lipid Res. 25, 667, 1989.]

    • Q: What about lard?

    • In this country, lard is toxic beause the pigs are fed large quantities of corn and soy beans. Besides the natural toxicity of the seed oils, the oils are contaminated with agricultural chemicals. Corn farmers have a very high incidence of cancer, presumably because corn "requires" the use of more pesticides. This probably makes corn oil's toxicity greater than it would be otherwise. but even the pure, organically grown material is toxic, because of its unsaturation.

    • Women with breast cancer have very high levels of agricultural pesticides in their breasts [See Science News, 1992, 1994].

    • Israel had the world's highest incidence of breast cancer when they allowed the insecticide lindane to be used in dairies, and the cancer rate decreased immediately after the government prohibited its use. The United States has fairly good laws to control the use of cancer-causing agents in the food supply, but they are not vigorously enforced. [World Incid. of Cancer, 1992]

    • Q: I have no control over oils when eating out. What can I do to offset the harmful effects of polyunsaturated oils?

    • A small amount of these oils won't kill you. It is the proportion of them in your diet that matters. A little extra vitamin E (such as 100 units per day) will take care of an occasional American restaurant meal. Based on animal studies, it would take a teaspoonful per day of corn or soy oil added to a fat-free diet to significantly increase our risk of cancer. Unfortunately, it is impossible to devise a fat-free diet outside of a laboratory. Vegetables, grains, nuts, fish and meats all naturally contain large amounts of these oils, and the extra oil used in cooking becomes a more serious problem.

    • Q Why are the unsaturated oils so popular if they are dangerous?

    • It's a whole system of promotion, advertising, and profitability.

    • 50 years ago, paints and varnishes were made of soy oil, safflower oil, and linseed (flax seed) oil. Then chemists learned how to make paint from petroleum, which was much cheaper. As a result, the huge seed oil industry found its crop increasingly hard to sell. Around the same time, farmers were experimenting with poisons to make their pigs get fatter with less food, and they discovered that corn and soy beans served the purpose, in a legal way. The crops that had been grown for the paint industry came to be used for animal food. Then these foods that made animals get fat cheaply came to be promoted as foods for humans, but they had to direct attention away from the fact that they are very fattening. The "cholesterol" focus was just one of the marketing tools used by the oil industry. Unfortunately it is the one that has lasted the longest, even after the unsaturated oils were proven to cause heart disease as well as cancer. [Study at L.A. Veterans Hospital, 1971.]

    • I use some of these oils (walnut oil is very nice, but safflower oil is cheaper) for oil painting, but I am careful to wash my hands thoroughly after I touch them, because they can be absorbed through the skin.


    • SUMMARY

    • Unsaturated fats cause aging, clotting, inflammation, cancer, and weight gain.

    • Avoid foods which contain the polyunsaturated oils, such as corn, soy, safflower, flax, cottonseed, canola, peanut, and sesame oil.

    • Mayonnaise, pastries, even candies may contain these oils; check the labels for ingredients.

    • Pork is now fed corn and soy beans, so lard is usually as toxic as those oils; use only lean pork.

    • Fish oils are usually highly unsaturated; "dry" types of fish, and shellfish, used once or twice a week, are good. Avoid cod liver oil.

    • Use vitamin E.

    • Use coconut oil, butter, and olive oil.

    • Unsaturated fats intensify estrogen's harmful effects.

      • Essential Fatty Acids ("EFA"): A Technical Point

      • Those fatty acids, such as linoleic acid and linolenic acid, which are found in linseed oil, soy oil, walnut oil, almond oil, corn oil, etc., are essential for the spontaneous development of cancer, and also appear to be decisive factors in the development of age pigment, alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes, obesity, stress-induced immunodeficiency, some aspects of the shock reaction, epilepsy, brain swelling, congenital retardation, hardening of the arteries, cataracts, and other degenerative conditions. They are possibly the most important toxin for animals.

      • The suppression of an enzyme system is characteristic of toxins. The "EFA" powerfully, almost absolutely, inhibit the enzyme systems--desaturases and elongases--which make our native unsaturated fatty acids.

      • After weaning, these native fats gradually disappear from the tissues and are replaced by the EFA and their derivatives. The age-related decline in our ability to use oxygen and to produce energy corresponds closely to the substitution of linoleic acid for the endogenous fats, in cardiolipin, which regulates the crucial respiratory enzyme, cytochrome oxidase.

      • Although the fish oils are less effective inhibitors of the enzymes, they are generally similar to the seed oils in their ability to promote cancer, age-pigment formation, free radical damage, etc. Their only special nutritional value seems to be their vitamin A and vitamin D content. Since vitamin A is important in the development of the eye, it is interesting that claims are being made for the essentiality of some of the fatty acid components of fish oil, in relation to the development of the eye.

      • The polyunsaturated oils from seeds are recommended for use in paints and varnishes, but skin contact with these substances should be avoided.







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    Default This Doesn't Contradict Peskin

    From my reading, these findings dovetail with Peskin's own research. I don't see where it disagrees with Peskin's basic points. Peskin recommends coconut oil in all of his writings and speeches, and he doesn't recommend any of the oils that this writer also doesn't think are safe.

    Where do you see a contradiction? Each and every point made by this author is corroborated in Peskin's own writings.





    Laura (Rosetapper)

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    Default really...you don't see where he disagrees?

    Well...i agree that Peskin has no problem with coconut oil...

    however, Peskin does recommend organic, unrefined safflower oil, flax oil, sunflower oil etc.

    Peat claims the following when asked:

    • Q: You say vegetable oils are hazardous to your health. What vegetable oils are you talking about?

    • Mainly, I'm referring to soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, canola, sesame oil, sunflower seed oil, palm oil, and any others that are labeled as "unsaturated" or "polyunsaturated." Almond oil, which is used in many cosmetics, is very unsaturated.

    • Chemically, the material that makes these oils very toxic is the polyunsaturated fat itself. These unsaturated oils are found in very high concentrations in many seeds, and in the fats of animals that have eaten a diet containing them. The fresh oils, whether cold pressed or consumed as part of the living plant material, are intrinsically toxic, and it is not any special industrial treatment that makes them toxic. Since these oils occur in other parts of plants at lower concentration, and in the animals which eat the plants, it is impossible to eat a diet which lacks them, unless special foods are prepared in the laboratory
    Peat also states:

    Unsaturated fats intensify estrogen's harmful effects.

    • Essential Fatty Acids ("EFA"): A Technical Point

    • Those fatty acids, such as linoleic acid and linolenic acid, which are found in linseed oil, soy oil, walnut oil, almond oil, corn oil, etc., are essential for the spontaneous development of cancer, and also appear to be decisive factors in the development of age pigment, alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes, obesity, stress-induced immunodeficiency, some aspects of the shock reaction, epilepsy, brain swelling, congenital retardation, hardening of the arteries, cataracts, and other degenerative conditions. They are possibly the most important toxin for animals
    So if you are taking PEOs as suggested by Peskin & not using either Safflower, Sunflower or Flax (Linseed) oil, could you tell me what you are using as i would like to use that myself?

    Brian Peskin suggested in an email to me that I use 2 teaspoons of Safflower oil to 1 teaspoon of Flax oil & take 1 1/2 teaspoons of this mix a day.

    So yes they do contradict each other on the point of vegetable oils.

    Another area of contradiction is that Peskin claims that it is the hydrogentation of these oils that makes them carcinogenic.

    Peat claims the following:

    However, the basic hardening process, hydrogenation of the oils, has been found to make the oils less likely to cause cancer. If I had to choose between eating ordinary corn oil or corn oil that was 100% saturated, to make a hard margarine, I would choose the hard margarine, because it resists oxidation, isn't suppressive to the thyroid gland, and doesn't cause cancer.

    I am quite surprised that you saw no contradictions between Peskin & Peat.

    connie






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    Default

    I'm new to both of these guys, but it's my understanding that hydrogenation is what makes oils toxic, so I can't agree with Peat. Also, there's no direct evidence that hydrogenated oils cause cancer. There is evidence that they increase your risk for heart disease and stroke.





    Sonya
    Graduate Student, Bookworm
    adipocyte: a fat cell! The smallest unit of fat.

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    Default

    I'm not entirely sure I agree with Peskin, but the more I read, I'd trust Peskin over Peat. Here is a rebuttal to Peat from the Weston Price web site. http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyour...tyaciddef.html

    For Peat to say there's no such thing as EFA deficiency and that they body can make it's own...is simply incorrect.





    Sonya
    Graduate Student, Bookworm
    adipocyte: a fat cell! The smallest unit of fat.

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    Default Weston Price..

    also a rebuttal to Peskin..

    http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyour...-and-efas.html

    admittedly not as harsh...






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    Default Ugh

    Here we go again, just when we think we might be doing something right....I would love for Brian to see this thread and let him respond, he is very good at responding to all of our questions. So, should I send him the link to this thread or cut and paste it to him in an e:mail.

    Thanks!
    Mary Ann






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    Default

    Deliria,
    I'm reading Peskin's book "Radiant Health". Thanks for this post. I'm not sure what to make of Peat's information.

    Regarding not seeing results, I would think that your body could still be in a state of healing. The surgery, anesthetic, radiation, etc certainly has to take a toll on our bodies. Also your thyroid replacement hormones are probably not optimized yet. Get the hormone replacement levels right can take quite some time. A classic sign of low thyroid function is dry skin.

    I wish you good health!

    Hopefully this does not cause more confusion. But did you see what Dr Mercola posted recently regarding Brian Peskin's info? I was going to post it and see what y'all thought then I saw your post.

    Here's the link: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...-Benefits.aspx

    Here's some of the info from the link:

    Safflower oil, which is typically used as a cooking oil, and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a compound naturally found in meat and dairy from grass-fed animals, are composed primarily of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

    While I have long advocated getting plenty of CLA in your diet -- along with helping your body rid itself of fat, CLA contains many anti-cancer properties -- I have also stated that we need to decrease our total intake of omega-6 fats, including those in safflower oil.

    This recommendation was based partly on the fact that omega-6 PUFAs are the building blocks of several types of inflammatory molecules, which might harm your heart and cause other illnesses by promoting inflammation in your body, coupled with the fact that most omega-6 fats in the American diet are highly processed and typically harmful.

    Well, after hearing a lecture by Life-Systems Engineering Scientist, Brian Peskin, which emphasized the importance of certain PUFAs, and subsequently having dinner with Brian and reading his book The Hidden Story of Cancer, I have recently begun to rethink some of my positions on this topic.

    Certain Omega-6 Fats May be Healthy

    There is no question you need to eliminate MUCH of the omega-6 fats in your diet, but these are the processed fats that have been refined and heated and become virtually useless, and even worse, very harmful.

    Brian’s theory, based on his study of Dr. Warburg's work from the 1930s, is that we should have about equal or twice as many parent omega-6 fats (linoleic acid, or LA) as parent omega-3 fats (alpha linolenic acid, or ALA). This is still a relatively small amount of oil, and only amounts to about 3 grams or four 750-mg capsules per day for a 150-pound adult.

    It will take me some time to thoroughly evaluate this theory, and when I conclude my analysis I will report my findings to you.

    In the meantime, you can likely benefit from one sound piece of advice, and that is to make sure your diet contains plenty of high-quality, and unprocessed, dietary fats.

    Make Sure the PUFAs in Your Diet are Not Processed

    If you want to take advantage of the health benefits of dietary fats like CLA and certain PUFAs, I do not recommend that you take CLA or other PUFA supplements of any form. As with most nutrients, it is better to get them from food than from synthetic supplements.

    In the case of CLA, animal products like meat and dairy from grass-fed animals are rich in natural and healthy CLA. So simply increasing your intake of grass-fed animal products will increase your intake of this important fatty acid. This includes not only grass-fed beef but also dairy products from grass-fed cows like raw milk, raw butter and raw milk cheese.

    If you simply start eating more commercially raised meat that is in most grocery stores, your health will not benefit because these animals were not fed a healthy diet. Grass-fed animals, on the other hand, have from three to five times more CLA than grain-fed animals.
    At the same time, if you want to increase your intake of omega-6 oils, it is essential to use only ORGANIC, unprocessed oils. Ideally this would be in the form of their original seed precursors like safflower, sunflower, pumpkin, or sesame seeds.

    Unfortunately, the primary sources of omega-6 in the U.S. are:

    •Corn oil
    •Canola oil
    •Soy oil
    •Hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats
    •Margarine
    •Shortening
    You will want to avoid this entire list of over-processed, damaged and genetically modified oils, and instead look for safflower, sunflower, pumpkin or sesame seed oils that meet the following requirements:

    1.Minimally processed: Look for expeller-pressed or cold-pressed oils, which are less likely to be damaged.
    2.Not refined: Refined oils are stripped of flavor, color and nutrients. Look for unrefined versions, which will appear cloudy and have a stronger flavor than refined oils.
    3.Bottled in dark-colored glass: Because omega-6 oils are easily damaged by heat and light, high-quality oils will be stored in dark-tinted bottles. You’ll also want to choose one packaged in glass, as plastic containers can potentially leach toxic compounds into the oil.
    What Other Types of Oils Should be Included in a Healthy Diet?

    The standard American diet (SAD) is almost devoid of healthy omega-3 fats, except for certain types of fish -- and fish can no longer be recommended as a safe source of omega-3s due to high levels of mercury and other toxic contaminations.

    This is why I highly recommend increasing your omega-3 intake by supplementing with a high quality animal-based supplement like krill oil (while at the same time reducing your intake of the processed omega-6 fats mentioned above).

    Other acceptable and beneficial oils to include in your diet are:

    •High-quality extra virgin olive oil
    •Coconut oil
    •Avocados and high-quality avocado oil
    •Organic butter, or better yet grass-fed, raw organic butter





    Kim in North Texas

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    Exclamation Answers from Mary Enig, Ph.D.

    Deliria, welcome to the Forum! I hope you're enjoying T-Tapping. Your post is eye-opening, and I've been reading through both articles on Ray Peat and on Brian Peskin. I noticed one of the references for the thyroid research was "B. Barnes," which would be Broda Barnes, a very famous endocrinologist who did groundbreaking research on the thyroid. If Dr. Barnes says Omega-6 oils slow the thyroid, then I believe it!

    Cod liver oil is safe and good for us. I had read decades ago that those who took in a lot of Omega-6 oils had a higher incidence of cancer, as compared to people who consumed butter and animal fats instead. Here is Dr. Enig's take on EFAs, in her answer to Ray Peat:

    Peat’s reasoning has led him to claim that cod liver oil causes cancer because cod liver oil contains polyunsaturated fatty acids. Actually, the main fatty acid in cod liver oil is a monounsaturated fatty acid. The two main polyunsaturated fatty acids in cod liver oil are the elongated omega-3 fatty acids called EPA and DHA, which play many vital roles in the body and actually can help protect against cancer. Furthermore, cod liver oil is our best dietary source of vitamins A and D, which also protect us against cancer.

    Actually, Peat’s argument that polyunsaturated fatty acids become harmful in the body and hence cause cancer simply does not make sense. It is impossible to avoid polyunsaturated fatty acids because they are in all foods.

    EFAs are, however, harmful in large amounts and the many research papers cited by Peat showing immune problems, increased cancer and premature aging from feeding of polyunsaturates simply corroborate this fact. But Peat has taken studies indicating that large amounts of EFAs are bad for us (a now well-established fact) and used them to argue that we don’t need any at all.

    Finally, it should be stressed that certain components of the diet actually reduce (but do not eliminate) our requirements for EFAs. The main one is saturated fatty acids which help us conserve EFAs and put them in the tissues where they belong. Some studies indicate that vitamin B6 can ameliorate the problems caused by EFA deficiency, possibly by helping us use them more efficiently.

    Now here is Dr. Enig's response to Brian Peskin:

    Over-Simplification

    While the mixture of fact and fantasy in Peskin's message results in much confusion on the part of the reader, what emerges is over-simplification in two major areas.

    First, our bodies can obviously handle a range of omega-6 to omega-3 ratios—if our body chemistry could only function at a precise ratio, the human race would have died out long ago. What we have learned from research on EFAs is that it is not good to have an extreme imbalance. The modern diet, in which omega-6 fatty acids predominate at a ratio of 20 to 1—with most of these omega-6 fatty acids rendered rancid by processing—creates serious imbalances on the cellular level; likewise, overdosing on flax oil or fish oil creates an imbalance in which omega-3s predominate, leading to lowered immunity—a finding of long standing which Peskin announces as though it were his own discovery.

    Modern research has also indicated that it is not healthy to consume too much of either of the EFAs, even though they may be in the "right" balance, and that the body uses EFAs to best advantage when the diet contains adequate saturated fat, an important fact which Peskin does not mention.

    Secondly, while the cells indeed need oxygen and EFAs in the cell membrane play a role in transporting oxygen into the cell, this is not a simple process, but one that depends on numerous co-factors, as Warburg rightly observed. These include the myriad components of the cell membrane, such as cholesterol, proteins and a variety of fatty acids, and minerals such as magnesium and manganese.

    As far as cancer prevention is concerned, EFAs represent a two-edged sword. Small numbers in the cell membrane do allow oxygen to enter the cell, but if the cell membrane contains too many unsaturated fatty acids, the cell becomes "leaky," with all sorts of compounds going into and out of the cell when they are not supposed to. EFAs can easily become rancid, meaning that free radicals develop during processing, cooking and exposure to air, causing uncontrolled reactions in the body. And finally, as mentioned earlier, a surfeit of EFAs lowers immunity. For these reasons, EFAs can contribute to cancer, even though they also play a role in preventing cancer.

    The upshot is that oil blends with magical EFA ratios are no panacea and claims that these products will definitively prevent cancer represent huckstering, however well disguised. Small amounts of essential fatty acids are available to us in all whole foods; the body uses these best in the context of a nutrient-dense diet containing adequate amounts of saturated fat. Foods rich in certain fatty acids—such as coconut oil, flax oil, evening primrose oil and cod liver oil—can play a role in the treatment and prevention of disease, but only when used with care along with a diet of real food.


    I underlined Dr. Enig's answer to both gentlemen (and Udo Erasmus, too, btw). Her point is, get your walnut oil from walnuts, your flax oil from ground flax, sunflower oil from sunflower seeds, eat salmon, eggs, butter, etc. It's all about eating whole foods.

    And to cook with? Use butter, coconut or palm oil, some olive oil, some sesame oil (for flavor). I think many of us (including me) have fallen into the convenience of taking capsules of oils rather than eating those foods that contain the oils in the first place - the fish, the nuts and seeds, the veggies. Sometimes a supplement is the only way to get enough into a person who resists eating the sources of those oils!






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    Default would love to here what Brian has to say...

    Quote Originally Posted by schoonma View Post
    Here we go again, just when we think we might be doing something right....I would love for Brian to see this thread and let him respond, he is very good at responding to all of our questions. So, should I send him the link to this thread or cut and paste it to him in an e:mail.

    Thanks!
    Mary Ann
    Would love to hear Brian's response to Peat's claims.

    Hopefully he will give a somewhat detailed response.

    Responses such as "This guy is an idiot, pay no attention to him" are of no use to anyone.






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